redisposition


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redisposition

(ˌriːdɪspəˈzɪʃən)
n
the withdrawal and redistribution of armed forces with the aim of more effective use
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.redisposition - the withdrawal and redistribution of forces in an attempt to use them more effectively
deployment - the distribution of forces in preparation for battle or work
References in periodicals archive ?
In practice, this could be realized by an enormous redisposition of water masses pumped out of the ocean and snowed onto the ice sheet at a rate of several hundred billion tons per year over a few decades.
"In practice, this could be realized by an enormous redisposition of water masses -- pumped out of the ocean and snowed onto the ice sheet at a rate of several hundred billion tons per year over a few decades," Feldmann (https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-07/pifc-wai071519.php) said.
This effect can be possibly related to stress readjustment of the rock massif, as well as to changes of redisposition of underground water as seen in the case of Walbrzych.
This process is possible thanks to a precise and complicated network of genes, proteins, and enzymes while engages a boundless redisposition of the actin cytoskeleton, through three stages in most of cells.
Software such as GIMP (Kimball & Mattis, 2014) and its equivalents enable not only for the trans-mediation of data from raw to raster graphic formats (e.g., TIF, EPS, GIF, JPG, etc.), but also for the editing or preparing photographs and other kinds of iconic imagery before engaging in the redisposition of the raw data.
Free verse may have publicized itself in its early years as an intensification of subjectivity, as the inimitable record of an individual's spiritual autobiography; but free verse is an invitation to the multiplication of subjectivities, to its own infinite rewritings, to its own constant vocal reorganization, and to the redisposition of its energies.
However, varying local site and growing conditions (e.g., topographically controlled redisposition of snow and its side effects, moisture, availability of nutrients, damage caused to new pines by reindeer [Rangfer tarandus], moose [Aces aces], and the mountain hare [Lepus timidus]) may impede or even prevent pine expansion, thus overriding the positive effects of increasing temperature.