redshank


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red·shank

 (rĕd′shăngk′)
n.
Either of two migratory shorebirds (Tringa totanus or T. erythropus) of the Eastern Hemisphere, having long red legs.

redshank

(ˈrɛdˌʃæŋk)
n
(Animals) either of two large common European sandpipers, Tringa totanus or T. erythropus (spotted redshank), having red legs
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.redshank - a common Old World wading bird with long red legsredshank - a common Old World wading bird with long red legs
sandpiper - any of numerous usually small wading birds having a slender bill and piping call; closely related to the plovers
genus Tringa, Tringa - a genus of Scolopacidae
Translations

redshank

[ˈredʃæŋk] Narchibebe m

redshank

[ˈrɛdˌʃæŋk] n (Zool) → pettegola
References in periodicals archive ?
A Garganey, Spotted Redshank and Ruff are at Foryd Bay, and an Osprey fished there on Monday morning.
Bolton Fell Moss is also seeing the return of a number of rare British plants and animals such as curlews, redshank and snipe, in addition to black darters, raft spiders, adders, lizards and the nationally significant large heath.
More than 200 species of birds have been spotted at the reserve, which is designated a Site of Special Scientific Interest for its nationally important populations of Lapwing, Snipe and Redshank.
"Our main concern is potential disturbance of two species of birds, redshank and dunlin, who roost on the Rhymney River spit alongside the site.
Among the waders were Curlew, Lapwing, Oystercatcher, Knot, Dunlin, Black-tailed Godwit, Redshank and Golden Plover.
This fine picture of a redshank was taken by Dave Pearce.
The piping of oyster-catchers bringing inland that flavour of sea-lashed shores, the reedier piping of redshank, the glorious "pee-witting" of the lapwing and the whistling of the curlew.
John Bruce, 46, of Redshank Close, Ayton, was last seen at 10.15pm on Saturday, when he left home.
Further research on declining species such as golden plover, curlew, redshank and lapwing found that numbers were up to five times greater on moorland managed for red grouse.
Over the next three weeks the Springwatch cameras will be covering a new area of the reserve for the first time revealing the wet woodland, reed-bed, and rare bog areas of the reserve, to follow the lives of lapwing, redshank, teal, reed bunting, sedge warbler and, with luck, stonechat and bullfinch.
Further west at Titchwell RSPB there were several Spotted Redshank - still sporting their jet-black summer plumage - and a number of Little Gulls, which are always a joy to see.