reductively


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re·duc·tive

 (rĭ-dŭk′tĭv)
adj.
1. Of or relating to reduction.
2. Relating to or exhibiting reductionism: "a series of demeaning, reductive stereotypes" (Richard Bernstein).
3. Relating to or exhibiting reductivism.

re·duc′tive·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

reductively

(rɪˈdʌktɪvlɪ)
adv
in a manner that is reductive
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
She deplored fine works of literature being treated reductively as a list of themes.
"SIX" begins with the number "Ex-Wives," in which the Queens exclaim that they're so much more than the rhyme that has reductively explained their fates: "Divorced, Beheaded, Died.
But there are skeptics that don't want to believe this, reductively dismissing our own state's decadence by blaming India.
(15) Or, in more technical terms, a natural phenomenon is reductively explainable in terms of some low-level properties when it is logically supervenient on those properties.
Apart from suffering from party disinterest, the forum has been reductively used to demonstrate political standoffs between unamenable factions of the polity through boycotts and absenteeism.
Pressures for so-called diversity--defined reductively by gonads and melanin--are, of course, nothing new.
To think the supposed leader of the free world would speak so reductively and heartlessly about so much of the world is unforgivable.
To think that the supposed leader of the free world would speak so reductively and heartlessly about so much of the world is unforgivable.
It's shocking that an American president would think so reductively and heartlessly about so much of the world.
And it may even help "rectify [its authors] neglect" in his native country, as Keki Daruwalla advocates in the foreword, or at least reintroduce a poet who is often remembered mostly, and somewhat reductively, in connection with an influential and still relevant anthology.
I wish to say that while I found the article intriguing in part, and scholarly, I firmly believe the same flaw is in this overview as in the article on men in Townsend a few months ago, advocating another potent drug, Clomid (clomiphene) that also isolated 5-alpha reductase as the primary, isolating factor that has to be managed reductively, sometimes with some very potent drugs.