reductiveness


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reductiveness

(rɪˈdʌktɪvnəs)
n
the state or quality of being reductive
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
If it were otherwise, that would impose a kind of reductiveness on the formation of Islam.
while also commenting on the reductiveness of the gay/straight binary.
One of the frustrating things about the game for me, as a scholar, has been its necessary reductiveness. It is difficult to describe the importance of a book in tweet-length (or card length) snippets.
Swinburne's "The Leper" (1866) reprises "Porphyria's Lover" (1842), "turning Browning's murderous speaker into a ministering clerk." If "Porphyria's Lover" "allegoris[es] the reductiveness of sceptics who demand tangible evidence for the reality of God," necrophilia in Swinburne's poem "pursues to its logical extremity the privileging of spirit over flesh in the Christian-Platonic ideal of love" (p.
Bit of volcano reductiveness. Sometimes I get this with Pinot Noir from Oregon.
To me, this account verges on the absurd in its reductiveness. In putting the complex tapestry of 20th-century Chinese history through the wringer of a monochromatic utilitarian philosophy according to which all human endeavors aim merely for the satisfaction of "sensuous needs" (12-13), the author is willfully blind to the all-consuming quests for national sovereignty, social justice, liberty, and individual rights and dignity (renge).
Caricatured as unambiguous to the point of reductiveness, the work was in fact anything but stable.
In its medial position as an aesthetic object, Cha's Dictee captures the scene of language in the call while simultaneously resisting the problematic reductiveness or essentialisms of capture.
For Said, philology connects readers of a certain text with an author and the historical world in which both the author and the text are situated thus making it possible for readers to encounter the text's resistance to reality: "fundamentally an act of perhaps modest human emancipation and enlightenment that changes and enhances one's knowledge for purposes other than reductiveness, cynicism, or fruitless standing aside" (Humanism 66).
Bloom's inference of reductiveness, as in "having said no to everything, in order to get at myself' arises from the concluding lines of the poem (48-9).
Instead of giving in to the reductiveness involved in categorising the components of the ageing body in an unaccommodating language that inevitably has to render a "wrinkle [...] banal", she instead gives a subjective account of a bodily experience.
The Literary Revival and Joyce's relationship to it is the main focus and this is welcome because, as Shovlin points out, the long held notion that Joyce's Irishness is problematic in relation to his modernist tendencies is simply ridiculous in its reductiveness. Undoubtedly much Irish literary criticism of the last twenty years has done a great deal to alert readers to the complexities of the Revivalist movement in Irish history and culture.