reed bunting

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reed bunting

n
(Animals) a common European bunting, Emberiza schoeniclus, that occurs near reed beds and has a brown streaked plumage with, in the male, a black head
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.reed bunting - European bunting inhabiting marshy areasreed bunting - European bunting inhabiting marshy areas
bunting - any of numerous seed-eating songbirds of Europe or North America
Emberiza, genus Emberiza - Old World buntings
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References in periodicals archive ?
The UK population of reed buntings fell by 31% between 1970 and 2007.
fractionally smaller buntings, also arctic Circle and with us, often in of snow bunting They have a lot brown on their more similar to reed buntings in have plainer and a rich brown their wings.
Birds which are attracted include reed buntings, skylarks, and grey and red partridge, as well as mammals.
Site manager Colin Wells said: "The area is an important breeding ground for birds such as reed buntings and water rails.
Small seeds, such as millet, |attract mostly house sparrows, dunnocks, finches, reed buntings and collared doves, while flaked maize is taken readily by blackbirds.
In July, August and September migrants have been calling in on their way south with a chance to see wood sandpipers and greenshank, while all year round reed buntings, lesser spotted woodpeckers and little egrets can be seen.
Small seeds, such as millet, attract mostly house sparrows, dunnocks, finches, reed buntings and collared doves, while flaked maize is taken readily by blackbirds.
"Species out this month include young kingfishers, who are using shallow pools to practice diving; reed buntings and warblers, which can easily be heard nesting in the reed beds; water voles and great crested newt tadpoles."
Besides well-known species like blackbirds and robins, your garden may also play host to more unusual species such as blackcaps, reed buntings, woodpeckers and yellowhammers.
FLOCKS of Reed Buntings in the fields are getting smaller as the males return to the waterside to set up territories.
They have a lot more brown on their backs and are more similar to the familiar reed buntings in winter, but have plainer reddish buff faces and a rich brown panel on their wings.