reeducate

(redirected from reeducated)

re·ed·u·cate

also re-ed·u·cate (rē-ĕj′ə-kāt′)
tr.v. re·ed·u·cat·ed, re·ed·u·cat·ing, re·ed·u·cates also re-ed·u·cat·ed or re-ed·u·cat·ing or re-ed·u·cates
1. To instruct again, especially in order to change someone's behavior or beliefs.
2. To retrain (a person) to function effectively; rehabilitate.

re·ed′u·ca′tion n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

re•ed•u•cate

(riˈɛdʒ ʊˌkeɪt)

v.t. -cat•ed, -cat•ing.
1. to educate again, as for new purposes.
2. to educate or train for resumption of normal activities, as a disabled person.
[1800–10]
re•ed`u•ca′tion, n.
re•ed′u•ca`tive, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Filipinos need to be reeducated being illiterate voters," he added.
China then threw out all foreign missionaries, shut down churches, imprisoned most of the Chinese Christian leaders, 'reeducated' believers and made it an offence to own a Bible or to be in possession of Christian literature.
Make sure you have a few days a month where you eat exactly what you like - you must have learned during your diet that what you put in your body really counts and you're now reeducated in healthy diet and nutrition.
Not only will plan documents need to be revised, the cost of a ruling must be added, all employee communications must be changed, new software must be developed, plan administrators must be reeducated, and the Department of Labor and the Internal Revenue Service will need to re-invent the filings, forms and procedures by which they monitor compliance.
Millions of victims perished in those hideous Orwellian exercises; millions more were allowed to survive the ordeal, but only after confessing their "crimes" and being completely "reeducated." One of the most revolting aspects of these brutal public displays, still very much a part of life in China, Cuba, and other Communist regimes, is the way in which friends, co-workers, and even family members are coerced to join in denouncing the designated victim.
These people were told they had to be reeducated. Anyone questioning the validity of wrongs that had become rights was accused of hate crimes, being bigoted, extremist, homophobic, anti-choice, mean-spirited, intolerant, or just plain wrong.
For the rest of us, however, who haven't been reeducated in Room 101, saying it, or being bullied into saying it, doesn't make it so.
I believe people come into the world wanting to do good, but are in fact "reeducated" every day to maintain a system around them of the "haves" and the "havenots." Do people need to be "re-educated" in order for transformation to happen?
Nurses must also be reeducated to provide more outcomes-oriented rather than task-focused care.