reentry

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re·en·try

also re-en·try (rē-ĕn′trē)
n. pl. re·en·tries also re-en·tries
1.
a. The act or action of reentering.
b. The return of a missile or spacecraft into the atmosphere.
2. The act of rejoining as a participant or member: programs to ease prisoners' reentry into society.
3. Law The recovery of possession of a property by an owner, pursuant to a right reserved in a lease or other agreement in the event of some breach of that agreement.
4. Games
a. The act of regaining the lead by taking a trick in bridge and whist.
b. The card that will take a trick and thus regain the lead.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

re•en•try

(riˈɛn tri)

n., pl. -tries.
1. the act of reentering.
2. the return from outer space into the earth's atmosphere of an earth-orbiting satellite, spacecraft, rocket, or the like.
3. Law. the retaking of possession under a right reserved in a prior conveyance.
4. Also called reen′try card`. (in bridge) a card that will win a trick enabling one to regain the lead in a hand.
[1425–75]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.reentry - the act of entering againreentry - the act of entering again    
return - the act of going back to a prior location; "they set out on their return to the base camp"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Although the number of individuals coming home from state and federal prison is staggering, there are additional salient realities to keep in mind as the nation considers the ramifications for its unprecedented reentry phenomenon. First, jails are an important but often overlooked part of the reentry conversation.
The field can only achieve results that match the magnitude of the reentry phenomenon if it recognizes the approach has been too timid.
Petersilia noted that if the capacity to manage re-integration had kept pace with the flow of inmates and their characteristics had remained the same, then the reentry phenomenon today would be no different than in times past.