refectory

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re·fec·to·ry

 (rĭ-fĕk′tə-rē)
n. pl. re·fec·to·ries
A room where meals are served, especially in a college or other institution.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

refectory

(rɪˈfɛktərɪ; -trɪ)
n, pl -tories
a communal dining hall in a religious, academic, or other institution
[C15: from Late Latin refectōrium, from Latin refectus refreshed]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

re•fec•to•ry

(rɪˈfɛk tə ri)

n., pl. -ries.
a dining hall, esp. in a religious house.
[1475–85; < Late Latin refectōrium= Latin refec-, variant s. of reficere (see refect) + -tōrium -tory2]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

refectory

1. cafeteria
2. A communal dining hall.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.refectory - a communal dining-hall (usually in a monastery)refectory - a communal dining-hall (usually in a monastery)
dining-hall - a large room at a college or university; used especially for dining
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
غُرْفَة طَعام
jídelna
spisesal
matsalur
refektorius
ēdamzāleēdnīca
refektár
yemekhane

refectory

[rɪˈfektərɪ] Nrefectorio m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

refectory

[rɪˈfɛktəri] nréfectoire m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

refectory

n (in college) → Mensa f; (in monastery) → Refektorium nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

refectory

[rɪˈfɛktrɪ] nrefettorio
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

refectory

(rəˈfektəri) noun
a dining-hall for monks, students etc.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
The nooks of ruin where the old monks had once had their refectories and gardens, and where the strong walls were now pressed into the service of humble sheds and stables, were almost as silent as the old monks in their graves.
Resistance was vain; and they were compelled to follow to a large room, which, rising on clumsy Saxon pillars, resembled those refectories and chapter-houses which may be still seen in the most ancient parts of our most ancient monasteries.
Let us say here that a prince's apartment was then composed of never less than eleven large rooms, from the chamber of state to the oratory, not to mention the galleries, baths, vapor-baths, and other "superfluous places," with which each apartment was provided; not to mention the private gardens for each of the king's guests; not to mention the kitchens, the cellars, the domestic offices, the general refectories of the house, the poultry-yards, where there were twenty-two general laboratories, from the bakehouses to the wine-cellars; games of a thousand sorts, malls, tennis, and riding at the ring; aviaries, fishponds, menageries, stables, barns, libraries, arsenals and foundries.
This beautifully illustrated study of nine Last Supper frescoes in Florentine refectories, monastic and conventual, from the mid-fourteenth to the late fifteenth centuries examines these art works from the perspective of the viewer and their gendered perceptions of the frescoes.
Florence is remarkable for its Last Supper trail of frescoes in the refectories of religious communities.