refight

refight

(riːˈfaɪt)
vb (tr)
to fight (someone or something) again
n
a second or new fight
References in periodicals archive ?
And it's unfortunate that Republicans have resorted to a taxpayer-funded lawsuit to refight a political fight that they keep losing.
He added that it is counterproductive to refight the financial crisis battles of 2008 and 2009.
Mr Kelleher said: "With rising chaos in many areas such as health, housing and crime Fine Gael's only answer is to desperately attempt to refight the 2011 election.
There has been no effort to build an effective barrier against illegal immigration; we end wars and then refight them; Iran, Russia, and China take little notice of U.
Anger is cultivated daily by the same jingoistic press that wants to refight Agincourt with the French over the migrant crisis and clear the Calais camp by force.
Obama had pledged earlier on Saturday not to refight the battles of the Cold War.
Rather than another reason to refight old arguments," Obama continued, "I hope that today's report can help us leave these techniques where they belong-in the past.
In politics there's always a temptation to overdo what works--to refight the last battle, especially if you won it, rather than look over the horizon.
They describe the ordinance, whose wage mandates could be waived by collective bargaining agreements, as an attempt by organized labor to refight a battle it lost in the past decade as many airport jobs went from union positions to so-called at-will contracts, which do not offer job security.
One faction of one party, in one house of Congress, in one branch of government doesn't get to shut down the entire government just to refight the results of an election,'' Mr.
We owe it to the Army to ensure better use of resources and not have to refight this problem in the future.