refinance


Also found in: Thesaurus, Financial, Wikipedia.

re·fin·ance

 (rē′fə-năns′, rē-fī′năns′)
v. re·fi·nanced, re·fi·nanc·ing, re·fi·nanc·es
v.tr.
To renegotiate or replace the financing of (a debt or asset), usually to obtain a lower interest rate.
v.intr.
To finance a debt or asset under new terms.

re·fi′nance′ n.
re′fi·nan′cer n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

refinance

(ˌriːfaɪˈnæns)
vb
(Banking & Finance) to pay (a debt) by borrowing additional money, thus creating a second debt in order to pay the first
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

re•fi•nance

(ˌri fɪˈnæns, riˈfaɪ næns)

v. -nanced, -nanc•ing. v.t.
1. to finance again.
2. to satisfy (a debt) by making another loan on new terms.
v.i.
3. to arrange new financing for something.
[1905–10]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.refinance - renew the financing of
finance - obtain or provide money for; "Can we finance the addition to our home?"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

refinance

verb take on a loan, borrow, remortgage It can be costly to refinance.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

refinance

[rːˈfaɪnæns] VTrefinanciar
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

refinance

[ˌriːfaɪˈnæns]
vtrefinancer
vise refinancer
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
People pursue a refinance because of value changes with the house, newer -- and better -- interest rates and other personal reasons.
In those situations, you can opt to refinance your home mortgage.
"Should I refinance" is what I will call a "contingent question." Some other examples are:
* A $19,019,461 first lien mortgage for the refinance of a 6 property multifamily portfolio in Brooklyn, NY.
A fluctuating economic climate and persistently-low interest rates are prompting a broad mix of Alaska businesses to refinance and restructure their existing debt.
Homeowners who survived the Great Recession with high debt-to-loan ratios completed 6,091 more refinances in May under the Home Affordable Refinance Program.
Borrowers refinancing through the Home Affordable Refinance Program (HARP) got an even bigger break, according to Freddie Mac.
In the United States, where housing equity makes up almost two thirds of the median household's total wealth, public policies have been crafted to encourage home ownership and to help households finance and refinance home mortgages.
Citizens Bank has unveiled its Education Refinance Loan, creating an option for students looking to refinance their private student loan debt.
" Under normal market conditions, they should be able to refinance at a high cost or with stringent covenants.
Southland Atlanta custom builders understand that the year's end might not be everyone's ideal time of year to refinance their homes, but before making that final decision, determine whether or not there is a good reason to refinance.