reflexive pronoun


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reflexive pronoun

Reflexive pronouns are used when someone or something is both the subject and the object of the same verb—that is, both that which is performing the action of the verb and that which is receiving the action. When this happens, the reflexive verb is used as the object of the verb to represent the person or thing.
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Noun1.reflexive pronoun - a personal pronoun compounded with -self to show the agent's action affects the agent
personal pronoun - a pronoun expressing a distinction of person
Translations
pronome reflexivo
References in periodicals archive ?
Insofar as any use of "myself" or another reflexive pronoun articulates a strong, unified sense of inferiority, it is Stoic on some level.
I won't -- don't need to condescend to that extent -- explain the errors involving the misuse use of the reflexive pronoun myself.
The grammar police could loiter outside school gates waiting to admonish tearaways for abusing a reflexive pronoun with intent.
38) On the other hand, there are three cases of the Milanese reflexive pronoun "me" for 1st person singular.
IT is well known that in Romanian and some forms of Sardinian, Dalmatian and Italo-Romance, the stressed oblique forms of the first and second person singular of the personal pronoun, and of the third person singular of the reflexive pronoun, have an augment syllable -ne.
For instance, the German infinitive in bitte beeilen 'please hurry up'; the verb is reflexive, sich beeilen, yet the reflexive pronoun is always ellipted in the directive (Duden Richtiges und gutes Deutsch 1985: 361).
The use of a reflexive pronoun (or a related form) to encode the occurrence of an arbitrary subject is common among the Slavic, Romance, and Germanic languages (Siewierska 1984, 1988).
The development of tanu- 'body' into a full reflexive pronoun is likely to be recent and can be traced, as the scarcity and lateness of RV passages which contain tanu- and an active verb suggest that this noun was reinterpreted as a reflexive pronoun in sentences whose middle verb originally conveyed a reflexive sense by itself.
Hajdu believes that the inflection comes from the Proto-Finnic 3P personal pronoun *sen, and only thereafter obtained the meaning of a reflexive pronoun ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] 1985 : 244-247).
An emendation worth considering (and easily explained as omission of nasal suspension) is `we[n]te', the regular past tense of wenden `turn, go away', (46) often followed by a reflexive pronoun and infinitive (usually, but not always, preceded by `to').
There is a difference between saying "Rembrandt fashioned himself" and "Rembrandt fashioned his self": the reflexive pronoun in the first predicate has merely deictic force, whereas in the second, the noun clause has referential force and implies commitment to an entity, the self.