reflowering

reflowering

(riːˈflaʊərɪŋ)
n
(Botany) an occurrence of flowering again
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References in periodicals archive ?
Nagata, The Reflowering of Malaysian Islam: Modern Religious Radicals and Their Roots (Vancouver, Canada: University of British Columbia Press, 1984), pp.
A remote high-desert site marks a wartime miscarriage as well as a community's remarkable reflowering.
Other species with florivory reduce fruit set from 55 to 64% (Sanchez-Lafuente, 2007; Martinez-Peralta and Mandujano, 2011), and no reflowering has been reported for wild Opuntia species after the attack of florivores.
Ben will always remain a voice of this country and its heritage, a link with the great Elizabethan tradition which is reflowering today, largely thanks to him," he said.
However, there is one class of woody shrubs that has not received the public attention for its proven track record of dependable reflowering (read continuous reblooming) throughout the summer season.
It's ironic that Gourmet magazine should be shut down when French food is reflowering and Julia Child's Mastering the Art of French Cooking remains on the best seller list.
Abrams, 1994), 174-89; and Gloria Orenstein, The Reflowering of the Goddess (New York: Pergamon Press, 1990).
The advantage of daylilies in the garden is that, once flowering stops and their leaves being to pale, they can be cut to the ground with confidence in their quick rejuvenation and reflowering.
Perhaps now, following his own instincts at last rather than conforming to the views of, and so trying to please, those he rode for, he was going to have, at 34, a not-that-late reflowering.
But even these alterations and improvements will be unlikely to result in a reflowering of the monastic life.
Rather than being the impetus for the widespread use of Hellenistic architectural or sculptural motifs, Cleopatra's influence might better be considered the culmination of, or at best the inspiration for, an evident reflowering of an already well-established fashion that was momentarily interrupted (88-79 BC) under Sulla.
Regardless of the paradise that Accad questions, "with virgins / Remaining ever virgin, reflowering after deflowering," we certainly have afterlives here on earth, where everything is handed from one to the next of us and nothing stays virginal; where culture, literature, economy, governance, even the rocks and air are touched and changed by all.