reformationist

reformationist

(ˌrɛfəˈmeɪʃənɪst)
n
someone who was part of the Reformationsomeone who believes in or initiates reform, esp of a religious nature
References in periodicals archive ?
Theologically, it combines reformationist and modern theology with spirituality, along with persons from the arts, including a Jewish perspective that caused this reviewer to notice better our Christian blinders.
Wayne Walker Pipkin has enjoyed a distinguished scholarly career spanning forty years, as a Reformationist paying particular attention to Huldrych Zwingli and Balthasar Hubmaier.
One striking feature here--which has also been pointed out for South Asia by Francis Robinson (1993; 2008)--is a 'reformationist' one of emphasizing the importance of direct access of the individual believer to the holy writ of God, thus undermining the monopoly on interpretation of imams or other intermediaries (cf.
The Pope's loss of power to nationalist and reformationist
Rushdoony was the intellectual leader of a new reformationist tendency within Protestantism called Christian reconstructionism (Clarkson, 1997).
Sir John Falstaff espouses a "reformationist" distrust of the image and reflects, in his powerful combination of corporeal presence and punishing rhetoric, a proto-Protestant scorn for ornamentation and hypocrisy.
(24) A Reformationist strain, Smilianskaia points out, had been present in Russia since the 16th century but never became an independent and influential movement as it did in Western Europe.
There was and is a powerful neo-Reformationist offshoot of liberal theology, founded by Karl Barth and Emil Brunner, that sought to refigure the Reformationist dialectic of Word and Spirit as the basis of Christian claims.
A modern reformationist movement founded and led by Jay H.
It also means that the Tabligh Jama'at and other 'reformationist' movements are now moving into African townships and giving new attention to Islamic practices in these contexts which have otherwise lived a life of their own, sustained by brotherhood linkages with Mozambique and the Swahili world.
America was the first country without a designated faith; here was the only place in the world where Catholics and Protestants, Radical Reformationists and Orthodox (not to mention Jews, Muslims, non-believers and others) could live as neighbors.
He amply documents distrust of the imagination in the works of William Tyndale, John Foxe, Stephen Gosson, William Perkins and many other Reformationists. As if inadvertent witnesses for the prosecution, the three poets were also beleaguered from within by doubts about the moral validity of poetry.