refuge


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ref·uge

 (rĕf′yo͞oj)
n.
1. Protection or shelter, as from danger or hardship: sought refuge from the storm in a cabin.
2.
a. A place providing protection or shelter: a colony that was a refuge for religious nonconformists.
b. An undeveloped area for the preservation of animals and plants.
3. A source of help, relief, or comfort in times of trouble: "Reva's love was her refuge from shame and degradation" (Richard Wright). See Synonyms at shelter.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin refugium, from refugere, to run away : re-, re- + fugere, to flee.]

refuge

(ˈrɛfjuːdʒ)
n
1. shelter or protection, as from the weather or danger
2. any place, person, action, or thing that offers or appears to offer protection, help, or relief: accused of incompetence, he took refuge in lying.
3. (Human Geography) another name for traffic island
vb
archaic to take refuge or give refuge to
[C14: via Old French from Latin refugium, from refugere to flee away, from re- + fugere to escape]

ref•uge

(ˈrɛf yudʒ)

n., v. -uged, -ug•ing. n.
1. shelter or protection from danger, trouble, etc.
2. a place of shelter or protection.
3. anything to which one has recourse for aid or escape.
v.t.
4. Archaic. to afford refuge to.
v.i.
5. Archaic. to take refuge.
[1350–1400; < Middle French < Latin refugium <refug(ere) to turn and flee, run away]

refuge

  • asylum - Comes from Greek asulon, "refuge," from asulos, "inviolable."
  • bast - A word for an asylum, refuge, or sanctuary.
  • harbor - First meant "shelter" and "lodging," and that is how the word first entered English place-names, as a "place of shelter; refuge" for a crowd of people. A port is a haven for vessels and it is equipped for loading and unloading ships, while a harbor is a haven for vessels but does not necessarily have onshore facilities.
  • redoubt - Has no connection to "doubt," but comes from French redoute and Latin reductus, "hidden place, refuge, stronghold."

refuge


Past participle: refuged
Gerund: refuging

Imperative
refuge
refuge
Present
I refuge
you refuge
he/she/it refuges
we refuge
you refuge
they refuge
Preterite
I refuged
you refuged
he/she/it refuged
we refuged
you refuged
they refuged
Present Continuous
I am refuging
you are refuging
he/she/it is refuging
we are refuging
you are refuging
they are refuging
Present Perfect
I have refuged
you have refuged
he/she/it has refuged
we have refuged
you have refuged
they have refuged
Past Continuous
I was refuging
you were refuging
he/she/it was refuging
we were refuging
you were refuging
they were refuging
Past Perfect
I had refuged
you had refuged
he/she/it had refuged
we had refuged
you had refuged
they had refuged
Future
I will refuge
you will refuge
he/she/it will refuge
we will refuge
you will refuge
they will refuge
Future Perfect
I will have refuged
you will have refuged
he/she/it will have refuged
we will have refuged
you will have refuged
they will have refuged
Future Continuous
I will be refuging
you will be refuging
he/she/it will be refuging
we will be refuging
you will be refuging
they will be refuging
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been refuging
you have been refuging
he/she/it has been refuging
we have been refuging
you have been refuging
they have been refuging
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been refuging
you will have been refuging
he/she/it will have been refuging
we will have been refuging
you will have been refuging
they will have been refuging
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been refuging
you had been refuging
he/she/it had been refuging
we had been refuging
you had been refuging
they had been refuging
Conditional
I would refuge
you would refuge
he/she/it would refuge
we would refuge
you would refuge
they would refuge
Past Conditional
I would have refuged
you would have refuged
he/she/it would have refuged
we would have refuged
you would have refuged
they would have refuged
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.refuge - a safe placerefuge - a safe place; "He ran to safety"  
area, country - a particular geographical region of indefinite boundary (usually serving some special purpose or distinguished by its people or culture or geography); "it was a mountainous area"; "Bible country"
harborage, harbourage - (nautical) a place of refuge (as for a ship)
2.refuge - something or someone turned to for assistance or security; "his only recourse was the police"; "took refuge in lying"
resource - a source of aid or support that may be drawn upon when needed; "the local library is a valuable resource"
shadow - refuge from danger or observation; "he felt secure in his father's shadow"
3.refuge - a shelter from danger or hardship
harbor, harbour - a place of refuge and comfort and security
safehold - a refuge from attack
safe house - a house used as a hiding place or refuge by members of certain organizations
shelter - a structure that provides privacy and protection from danger
4.refuge - act of turning to for assistance; "have recourse to the courts"; "an appeal to his uncle was his last resort"
assist, assistance, help, aid - the activity of contributing to the fulfillment of a need or furtherance of an effort or purpose; "he gave me an assist with the housework"; "could not walk without assistance"; "rescue party went to their aid"; "offered his help in unloading"

refuge

noun
1. protection, security, shelter, harbour, asylum, sanctuary They took refuge in a bomb shelter.
2. haven, resort, retreat, harbour, sanctuary, hideaway, hide-out, bolt hole, place of safety We climbed up a winding track towards a mountain refuge.
3. solace, relief, comfort Father Rowan took refuge in silence.

refuge

noun
1. The state of being protected or safeguarded, as from danger or hardship:
2. Something that physically protects, especially from danger:
3. That to which one turns for help when in desperation:
Translations
مَلْجأمَلْجَأ
útočištěúkryt
tilflugttilflugtssted
turvapaikkasuojasuojapaikkaturva
utočište
skÿli, athvarf
避難所
피난처
pabėgėlis
glābiņšpatvērums
zateči sezatočišče
tillflykt
ที่หลบภัย
nơi trú ẩn

refuge

[ˈrefjuːdʒ] N (= shelter) → refugio m; (= shelter for climbers) → albergue m; (= hut) → albergue m (fig) → amparo m, abrigo m
God is my refugeDios es mi amparo
to seek refugebuscar refugio, buscar dónde guarecerse
to take refugeponerse al abrigo, guarecerse
to take refuge in sthrefugiarse en algo (fig) → recurrir a algo

refuge

[ˈrɛfjuːdʒ] n
(= place to shelter) → refuge m
A small cave was the only refuge from the cold → Une petite grotte était le seul refuge contre le froid.
There was no refuge from the storm → Il n'y avait aucun refuge contre l'orage.
to take refuge from sth [+ storm, bad weather] → s'abriter de qch
(= safety) → refuge m
a place of refuge → un refuge
to seek refuge → chercher refuge
to take refuge → trouver refuge
to take refuge from sth [+ fighting, reprisals] → trouver refuge contre qch
(= safe house) → refuge m
a refuge for battered women → un refuge pour femmes battues
(= hut) → refuge m
a mountain refuge → un refuge de montagne
(= psychological escape) → refuge m
a refuge from sth → un refuge contre qch
to take refuge in sth → se réfugier dans qch
to seek refuge in sth → chercher refuge dans qch

refuge

n
(lit, fig)Zuflucht f (→ from vor (+dat)); place of refugeZufluchtsort m; a refuge for battered womenein Frauenhaus nt; to seek refugeZuflucht suchen; to seek refuge in silencesich in Schweigen flüchten; to take refugeZuflucht nehmen (→ in in (+dat)), → sich flüchten (→ in in (+acc)); he took refuge in drink and drugser nahm Zuflucht zu Alkohol und Drogen; she found refuge in booksBücher waren ihre Zuflucht
(for climbers, pedestrians) → Unterstand m

refuge

[ˈrɛfjuːdʒ] n (shelter) → riparo; (for climbers, battered wives) (fig) → rifugio
place of refuge → rifugio
to take refuge in (also) (fig) → rifugiarsi in

refuge

(ˈrefjuːdʒ) noun
(a place which gives) shelter or protection from danger, trouble etc. The escaped prisoner sought refuge in the church.
ˌrefuˈgee noun
a person who seeks shelter especially in another country, from war, disaster, or persecution. Refugees were pouring across the frontier; (also adjective) a refugee camp.

refuge

مَلْجَأ útočiště tilflugtssted Zuflucht καταφύγιο refugio turvapaikka refuge utočište rifugio 避難所 피난처 toevluchtsoord tilflukt schronienie refúgio убежище tillflykt ที่หลบภัย sığınak nơi trú ẩn 庇护

refuge

n. refugio; asilo;
v.
to take ___refugiarse.
References in classic literature ?
This was Jo's favorite refuge, and here she loved to retire with half a dozen russets and a nice book, to enjoy the quiet and the society of a pet rat who lived near by and didn't mind her a particle.
Her day had been quite filled up, and it was for a rest, for a refuge, and to talk about Robert, that she sought out her friend.
Duncan listened with intense anxiety for the strokes of the paddle, believing that flight was now their only refuge.
Jessie Carr's half-frightened smile took refuge in the trembling shadows of her dark lashes; Christie Carr stiffened slightly, and looked straight before her.
It was the Eden of a thunder-smitten Adam, who had fled for refuge thither out of the same dreary and perilous wilderness into which the original Adam was expelled.
She fled for refuge, as it were, to the public exposure, and dreaded the moment when its protection should be withdrawn from her.
I felt that I didn't know so well as Miles, and I took temporary refuge.
The lamp alarms and frightens Jonah; as lying in his berth his tormented eyes roll round the place, and this thus far successful fugitive finds no refuge for his restless glance.
But this objection likewise falls to the ground, because a German exegetist supposes that Jonah must have taken refuge in the floating body of a dead whale -- even as the French soldiers in the Russian campaign turned their dead horses into tents, and crawled into them.
This depot was within the danger line for Jurgis--in the "Levee" district, where he was known; but he went there, all the same, for he was desperate, and beginning to think of even the Bridewell as a place of refuge.
Like a certain class of modern philosophers, Dinah perfectly scorned logic and reason in every shape, and always took refuge in intuitive certainty; and here she was perfectly impregnable.
In other words, when a sixth of the population of a nation which has undertaken to be the refuge of liberty are slaves, and a whole country is unjustly overrun and conquered by a foreign army, and subjected to military law, I think that it is not too soon for honest men to rebel and revolutionize.