regalist

regalist

(ˈriːɡəlɪst)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a person who believes in or promotes regalism
References in periodicals archive ?
Similarly, the belief that the Society represented Roman intrusion in the affairs of national churches clearly played a role, not least in the regalist Spain of Charles III (r.
By the reign of Charles IV (1788-1808), regalist ministers would take political authority over Spanish Catholicism to its furthest extent by granting bishops full faculty of authority in the last days of the 18th century.
The author shows this phenomenon by analyzing the brief yet ascendant career of one of the most aggressive proponents of the regalist programs, Fryderyk Jagiellon (1468-1503): the youngest son of the Jagiellonian monarchs, King Kazimierz IV and Queen Elizabeth Habsburg, brother of the rulers of Poland, Lithuania, Hungary, and Bohemia, brother-in-law to five electors and princes of the Holy Roman Empire, Bishop of Cracow (then the Polish capital), primate, senator, and regent of Poland, and cardinal of the Roman Church.
Montufar, along with the bishop of Michoacan, the highly regalist former lawyer Vasco de Quiroga, promoted a Tridentine reform of the Mexican Church parallel to efforts in Spain.
Long ago Sorel observed that the Braganza and Bourbon drive against the Jesuits from the 1750s to the 1770s was one of the rare instances of a shared regalist campaign in Europe informed by a similar set of suspicions leading to the first suppression of the Society by Clement XIV in 1773.
It upheld a rigorous regalist view concerning the Church in Portugal.
The controversy embraced a variety of positions, hierocratic and anti-hierocratic, imperialist and regalist, advanced by a series of writers of the late thirteenth and early fourteenth centuries: Jordanus of Osnabruck and Alexander of Roes; Thomas Aquinas and Tolomeo of Lucca, with the latter's assimilation of the Roman Republic into the history of the Empire bequeathed by Constantine to the Popes; Egidio Romano (Giles of Rome) and Boniface VIII's Bull Unam sanctam of November 1302; John of Paris; Dante's own friend, the jurist Cino of Pistoia; Engelbert of Admont; slightly later, Marsilio of Padua.
One context of Taylor's study is the effect on colonial Mexican parishes of the royal administrative changes known as the Bourbon Reforms, in particular the impact at the rural parish level of regalist tendencies, which accelerated the process of parish secularization, encouraged anticlericalism, and exacerbated conflicts over clerical fees.