regency


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re·gen·cy

 (rē′jən-sē)
n. pl. re·gen·cies
1. A person or group selected to govern in place of a monarch or other ruler who is absent, disabled, or still in minority.
2. The period during which a regent governs.
3. The office, area of jurisdiction, or government of regents or a regent.
adj.
1. Regency Of, relating to, or characteristic of the style prevalent in England during the regency (1811-1820) of George, Prince of Wales (later George IV).
2. Regency Of, relating to, or characteristic of the style prevalent in France during the regency (1715-1723) of Philippe, Duc d'Orléans (1674-1723).
3. Of or relating to a regency: regency policies and appointments that were later rescinded.

regency

(ˈriːdʒənsɪ)
n, pl -cies
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) government by a regent or a body of regents
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the office of a regent or body of regents
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a territory under the jurisdiction of a regent or body of regents
[C15: from Medieval Latin regentia, from Latin regere to rule]

Regency

(ˈriːdʒənsɪ)
n
1. (Historical Terms) (in the United Kingdom) the period (1811–20) during which the Prince of Wales (later George IV) acted as regent during his father's periods of insanity
2. (Historical Terms) (in France) the period of the regency of Philip, Duke of Orleans, during the minority of Louis XV (1715–23)
adj
(Historical Terms) characteristic of or relating to the Regency periods in France or the United Kingdom or to the styles of architecture, furniture, art, literature, etc, produced in them

re•gen•cy

(ˈri dʒən si)

n., pl. -cies,
adj. n.
1. the office, jurisdiction, or control of a regent or regents.
2. a body of regents.
3. a government consisting of regents.
4. a territory under the control of a regency.
5. the term of office of a regent.
6. (cap.) the period (1811–20) during which the Prince of Wales, later George IV, was regent of England.
7. (cap.) the period (1715–23) during which Philip, Duke of Orleans, was regent of France.
adj.
8. of or pertaining to a regency.
9. (cap.) of or pertaining to the Regencies in England or France.
10. (often cap.) of or designating the style of architecture, furniture, etc., in England around the time of the Regency, similar to the French Directoire and Empire styles.
[1400–50; < Medieval Latin rēgentia]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.regency - the period of time during which a regent governs
rule - the duration of a monarch's or government's power; "during the rule of Elizabeth"
2.Regency - the period from 1811-1820 when the Prince of Wales was regent during George III's periods of insanity
England - a division of the United Kingdom
3.regency - the office of a regent
berth, billet, post, situation, position, office, place, spot - a job in an organization; "he occupied a post in the treasury"
Translations

regency

[ˈriːdʒənsɪ]
A. Nregencia f
B. CPD Regency furniture Nmobiliario m Regencia, mobiliario m estilo Regencia

Regency

[ˈriːdʒənsi]
n
the Regency (in England, 1811-1830)la Régence, la Régence anglaise
modif [house, chair, furniture] → Régence, Regency; [period] → de la Régence anglaise

regency

[ˈriːdʒənsi] n (period of rule by a regent)régence f

regency

nRegentschaft f; the Regency (period) (Brit Art etc) → der Regency; Regency furniture/style (Brit Art etc) → Regencymöbel pl/-stil m

Regency

[ˈriːdʒnsɪ]
1. n the Regency (in England) la reggenza del principe di Galles, futuro Giorgio IV; (in France) → la Reggenza
2. adj (style) → reggenza inv; (house, furniture) → (in) stile reggenza inv

regency

[ˈriːdʒnsɪ] nreggenza
References in classic literature ?
The all-powerful minister, who had taken her regency from the queen, and his royalty from the king, had not been able to take a good stomach from nature.
A dim line of ancestors, in every variety of dress, from the Elizabethan knight to the buck of the Regency, stared down upon us and daunted us by their silent company.
He was one of those four musketeers who, under the late king, made Cardinal de Richelieu tremble, and who, during the regency, gave so much trouble to Monseigneur Mazarin."
He was not in a pleasant humor; and every time I hinted that perhaps this contract was a shade too hefty for a novice he unlimbered his tongue and cursed like a bishop -- French bishop of the Regency days, I mean.
But before this, Lady Jane conducted Rebecca to the apartments prepared for her, which, with the rest of the house, had assumed a very much improved appearance of order and comfort during Pitt's regency, and here beholding that Mrs.
It was in the days of the Regency that the Dawlish coffers first began to show signs of cracking under the strain, in the era of the then celebrated Beau Dawlish.
The first morning of her regency, Miss Ophelia was up at four o'clock; and having attended to all the adjustments of her own chamber, as she had done ever since she came there, to the great amazement of the chambermaid, she prepared for a vigorous onslaught on the cupboards and closets of the establishment of which she had the keys.
'Aha!' replied the old gentleman, 'I began to be afeerd that you'd gone for a walk round the Regency Park, Sammy.'
"I knew there were smugglers, but I thought that since the capture of Algiers, and the destruction of the regency, pirates existed only in the romances of Cooper and Captain Marryat."
In the last century, however, four successive heirs were of a dissolute and wasteful disposition, and the family ruin was eventually completed by a gambler in the days of the Regency. Nothing was left save a few acres of ground, and the two-hundred-year-old house, which is itself crushed under a heavy mortgage.
"We will be two old friends," said des Lupeaulx, "and suppress all tender nonsense and tormenting love; we will take things as they did under the Regency. Ah!
The project has delivered infrastructure upgrades and the provision of fully controlled right turns on Regency Road to reduce the potential for right turn crashes at the intersection.