regeneration


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re·gen·er·a·tion

 (rĭ-jĕn′ə-rā′shən)
n.
The act or process of regenerating or the state of being regenerated, especially:
a. Biology Regrowth of lost or destroyed parts or organs.
b. Spiritual or moral revival or rebirth.

regeneration

(rɪˌdʒɛnəˈreɪʃən)
n
1. the act or process of regenerating or the state of being regenerated; rebirth or renewal
2. (Biology) the regrowth by an animal or plant of an organ, tissue, or part that has been lost or destroyed
3. (Electronics) electronics the use of positive feedback to increase the amplification of a radio frequency stage

re•gen•er•a•tion

(rɪˌdʒɛn əˈreɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the act of regenerating or the state of being regenerated.
2. the regrowth of a lost or injured part of the body.
3. spiritual rebirth; religious revival.

re·gen·er·a·tion

(rĭ-jĕn′ə-rā′shən)
Regrowth of lost or destroyed parts or organs. Certain lizards, for example, can regenerate their tails if they lose them to a predator, and a number of invertebrate animals, such as starfish, can be cut into several pieces that will each regenerate into a whole new organism. Regeneration is common in plants, where cuttings can grow into a new plant.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.regeneration - (biology) growth anew of lost tissue or destroyed parts or organsregeneration - (biology) growth anew of lost tissue or destroyed parts or organs
biological science, biology - the science that studies living organisms
morphallaxis - regeneration on a reduced scale of a body part; observed especially in invertebrates such as certain lobsters
biological process, organic process - a process occurring in living organisms
2.regeneration - feedback in phase with (augmenting) the input
feedback - the process in which part of the output of a system is returned to its input in order to regulate its further output
vicious circle, vicious cycle - one trouble leads to another that aggravates the first
3.regeneration - the activity of spiritual or physical renewal
resurgence, revitalisation, revitalization, revival, revivification - bringing again into activity and prominence; "the revival of trade"; "a revival of a neglected play by Moliere"; "the Gothic revival in architecture"
4.regeneration - forming again (especially with improvements or removal of defects); renewing and reconstituting
reconstruction - the activity of constructing something again

regeneration

noun
A fundamental change in one's beliefs:
Translations

regeneration

[rɪˌdʒenəˈreɪʃən] Nregeneración f

regeneration

[rɪˌdʒɛnəˈreɪʃən] n
[area] → régénération f; [economy] → régénération f
economic regeneration → régénération économique
[cells] → régénération f

regeneration

n
(= renewal, re-creation)Erneuerung f; (fig: of person: by holiday etc) → Erholung f
(Elec) → Rückkoppelung f

regeneration

[rɪˌdʒɛnəˈreɪʃn] n (frm) (of economy, society) → rigenerazione f; (of feelings, enthusiasm) → rinnovamento

re·gen·er·a·tion

n. regeneración, restauración, renovación.

regeneration

n regeneración f
References in classic literature ?
Why, to maintain this theory of the regeneration of mankind by means of the pursuit of his own advantage is to my mind almost the same thing
Deep unspeakable suffering may well be called a baptism, a regeneration, the initiation into a new state.
That society was sadly wrong he was convinced, but he propounded no definite plan for its regeneration. He had become, however, a much venerated as well as a picturesque figure; and he exerted a powerful and constructive influence, not only directly, but indirectly through the preaching of his doctrines, in the main or in part, by the younger essayists and the chief Victorian poets and novelists, and in America by Emerson, with whom he maintained an almost lifelong friendship and correspondence.
Janvier, the new parson, began to divide the work of regeneration with me.
Whether he accepted the wise reasoning contained in the Mason's words, or believed as a child believes, in the speaker's tone of conviction and earnestness, or the tremor of the speaker's voice- which sometimes almost broke- or those brilliant aged eyes grown old in this conviction, or the calm firmness and certainty of his vocation, which radiated from his whole being (and which struck Pierre especially by contrast with his own dejection and hopelessness)- at any rate, Pierre longed with his whole soul to believe and he did believe, and felt a joyful sense of comfort, regeneration, and return to life.
that such an enterprise as the regeneration of England should turn on a hinge so imperfect!
"A singular regeneration must take place in my whole inner and outer man before I do that.
And of all means to regeneration Remorse is surely the most wasteful.
He walked frail, insignificant, shabby, miserable - and terrible in the simplicity of his idea calling madness and despair to the regeneration of the world.
But that is the beginning of a new story--the story of the gradual renewal of a man, the story of his gradual regeneration, of his passing from one world into another, of his initiation into a new unknown life.
I remained an inmate of its walls, after its regeneration, for eight years: six as pupil, and two as teacher; and in both capacities I bear my testimony to its value and importance.
The Marquis took a gentle little pinch of snuff, and shook his head; as elegantly despondent as he could becomingly be of a country still containing himself, that great means of regeneration.