regent


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re·gent

 (rē′jənt)
n.
1. One who rules during the minority, absence, or disability of a monarch.
2. One acting as a ruler or governor.
3. A member of a board that governs an institution, such as a state university.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin regēns, regent-, ruler, from present participle of regere, to rule; see reg- in Indo-European roots.]

re′gent·al (-jən-tl) adj.

regent

(ˈriːdʒənt)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the ruler or administrator of a country during the minority, absence, or incapacity of its monarch
2. (Education) (formerly) a senior teacher or administrator in any of certain universities
3. (Professions) (formerly) a senior teacher or administrator in any of certain universities
4. (Education) US and Canadian a member of the governing board of certain schools and colleges
5. (Professions) US and Canadian a member of the governing board of certain schools and colleges
6. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) rare any person who governs or rules
adj
7. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (usually postpositive) acting or functioning as a regent: a queen regent.
8. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) rare governing, ruling, or controlling
[C14: from Latin regēns ruling, from regere to rule]
ˈregental adj
ˈregentship n

re•gent

(ˈri dʒənt)

n.
1. a person who exercises the ruling power in a kingdom during the minority, absence, or disability of the sovereign.
2. a ruler or governor.
3. a member of the governing board of a state university or a state educational system.
4. any of various officers of academic institutions.
adj.
5. acting as regent of a kingdom (usu. used postpositively): a prince regent.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin regent- (s. of regēns), present participle of regere to rule]
re′gent•al, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.regent - members of a governing boardregent - members of a governing board  
governing board - a board that manages the affairs of an institution
committee member - a member of a committee
2.regent - someone who rules during the absence or incapacity or minority of the country's monarch
ruler, swayer - a person who rules or commands; "swayer of the universe"
Adj.1.regent - acting or functioning as a regent or ruler; "prince-regent"
combining form - a bound form used only in compounds; "`hemato-' is a combining form in words like `hematology'"
powerful - having great power or force or potency or effect; "the most powerful government in western Europe"; "his powerful arms"; "a powerful bomb"; "the horse's powerful kick"; "powerful drugs"; "a powerful argument"
Translations
وَصي على العَرْش
-karegent
regent
ríkisstjóri
regentas
regent
hükümdar vekilinaip

regent

[ˈriːdʒənt]
A. ADJ prince regentpríncipe m regente
B. Nregente mf

regent

[ˈriːdʒənt] n [country] → régent(e) m/f

regent

nRegent(in) m(f); (US, Univ) → Mitglied ntdes Universitäts- or Schulverwaltungsrats ? prince regent

regent

[ˈriːdʒnt] nreggente m/f

regent

(ˈriːdʒent) noun
a person who governs in place of a king or queen. The prince was only two years old when the king died, so his uncle was appointed regent.
References in classic literature ?
I determined to stroll home in the purer air by the most roundabout way I could take; to follow the white winding paths across the lonely heath; and to approach London through its most open suburb by striking into the Finchley Road, and so getting back, in the cool of the new morning, by the western side of the Regent's Park.
He asked also who was in the coach, whither they were bound and what money they had, and one of the men on horseback replied, "The persons in the coach are my lady Dona Guiomar de Quinones, wife of the regent of the Vicaria at Naples, her little daughter, a handmaid and a duenna; we six servants are in attendance upon her, and the money amounts to six hundred crowns."
procurer] of the letters to obtain any comfort thereby ; for in that time God was despised, and the lawful authority was contemned in Scotland, in hope of the sudden return and regiment of that cruel murderer of her awin husband, of whose lords the said Earl was called one; and yet, oftener than once, he was solemnly sworn to the King and to his Regent.''
First came a stout puffy gentleman with a carpet bag; he wanted to go to the Bishopsgate station; then we were called by a party who wished to be taken to the Regent's Park; and next we were wanted in a side street where a timid, anxious old lady was waiting to be taken to the bank; there we had to stop to take her back again, and just as we had set her down a red-faced gentleman, with a handful of papers, came running up out of breath, and before Jerry could get down he had opened the door, popped himself in, and called out, "Bow Street Police Station, quick!" so off we went with him, and when after another turn or two we came back, there was no other cab on the stand.
I walked across Regent's Park, and I dawdled on Primrose Hill, without the least result.
Philip took him sometimes to the tavern off Regent Street.
There were one or two cartloads of refugees passing along Oxford Street, and several in the Marylebone Road, but so slowly was the news spreading that Regent Street and Port- land Place were full of their usual Sunday-night promenaders, albeit they talked in groups, and along the edge of Regent's Park there were as many silent couples "walking out" together under the scattered gas lamps as ever there had been.
The coachman was instructed to purchase for him the handsomest pony which could be bought for money, and on this George was taught to ride, first at a riding-school, whence, after having performed satisfactorily without stirrups, and over the leaping-bar, he was conducted through the New Road to Regent's Park, and then to Hyde Park, where he rode in state with Martin the coachman behind him.
His first visit was for Houston, who had a house on Regent Terrace, kept for him in old days by an aunt.
Regent street is not unknown to Lascars and Malays; and at Bombay, in the Apollo Green, live Yankees have often scared the natives.
Then, still keeping a hundred yards behind, we followed into Oxford Street and so down Regent Street.
For this gathering, the Zoological Hall which had been the scene of the inception of our task was found to be far too small, and it was only in the Queen's Hall in Regent Street that accommodation could be found.