regressive


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re·gres·sive

 (rĭ-grĕs′ĭv)
adj.
1. Tending to return or revert to a previous state.
2. Characterized by regression or a tendency to regress.
3. Relating to or being a tax that amounts to a higher percentage of income as income decreases or that places a proportionately higher burden on lower-income taxpayers.
4. Of or relating to geological regression.

re·gres′sive·ly adv.
re·gres′sive·ness n.

regressive

(rɪˈɡrɛsɪv)
adj
1. regressing or tending to regress
2. (Economics) (of a tax or tax system) levied or graduated so that the rate decreases as the amount taxed increases. See progressive5
3. (Psychology) of, relating to, or characteristic of regression
4. (Geological Science) of, relating to, or characteristic of regression
5. (Statistics) of, relating to, or characteristic of regression
6. (Astronomy) of, relating to, or characteristic of regression
7. (Logic) of, relating to, or characteristic of regression
reˈgressively adv
reˈgressiveness, reˌgresˈsivity n

re•gres•sive

(rɪˈgrɛs ɪv)

adj.
1. regressing or tending to regress; retrogressive.
2. (of tax) decreasing proportionately with an increase in the tax base.
[1625–35]
re•gres′sive•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.regressive - (of taxes) adjusted so that the rate decreases as the amount of income increases
revenue enhancement, tax, taxation - charge against a citizen's person or property or activity for the support of government
progressive - (of taxes) adjusted so that the rate increases as the amount of income increases
2.regressive - opposing progress; returning to a former less advanced state
backward - directed or facing toward the back or rear; "a backward view"
progressive - favoring or promoting progress; "progressive schools"
Translations

regressive

[rɪˈgresɪv] ADJregresivo

regressive

adjregressiv; trendrückläufig; behaviour, decisionrückschrittlich

regressive

[rɪˈgrɛsɪv] adj (frm) → regressivo/a
a regressive step (fig) → un passo indietro
regressive tax (Econ) → imposta regressiva
References in periodicals archive ?
A regressive relationship is one in which the educator is less developmentally advanced with respect to racial/ethnic identity development than the student is.
The problematics of the former, although credited in the creation myth of mainline Euro-American abstraction, were considered totally regressive by the '70s, and the concerns of the latter (the arrival at the Whitney of Jim Nutt's 1974 traveling survey notwithstanding) were basically off the grid of New York consciousness.
Richard John Neuhaus wrote, "With the election of Pope Benedict XVI, the curtain has fallen on the long-running drama of the myth of "the spirit of Vatican II," in which the revolution mandated by the Council was delayed by the timidity of Paul VI and temporarily derailed for twenty-plus years by the regressive John Paul II, as the Church inexorably moved toward the happy denouement of "the next pope" who would resume the course of progressive accommodation to the wisdom of the modern world" ("Rome Diary," First Things online).
I am not a blind supporter of Sweeney's policies and am fundamentally opposed to much of the AFL-CIO's support for a regressive foreign policy in Venezuela and Israel.
It is regrettable that conservative think-tanks dominate what little discussion there is on welfare and that they are the only ones producing new, albeit regressive, ideas on welfare.
According to Batra, Greenspan is responsible for the rise of regressive taxation here and abroad, budget deficits, trade deficits, rising income inequality, the loss of manufacturing jobs, shrinking paychecks, and the growth of debt worldwide.
The Suits Index measures how regressive or progressive a tax is on a scale from -1 (regressive) to +1 (progressive), with 0 representing a neutral tax.
Whereas in Bloch's reading 'Heimat' connotes a utopian dimension and even a political potential for the left, Blickle places 'Heimat' discourse firmly in the tradition of pre-modern, largely regressive thinking.
"Universal" assistance is outright regressive, with over 62% of assistance going to students from families with above median incomes.
How their stories are organized is one important property: Are they stable, progressive or regressive? (11) Some narratives suggest a stable pattern, where little change has occurred during a particular time frame.
In a recent letter Lib Dem Councillor Mike Cherrett claims the current system of higher education funding is a "regressive scheme" (Campus Chaos, 28.6.03).
In the case of regressive taxes we are trying to eliminate small taxes that aren't worthwhile to collect and generate costs.