reindict

reindict

(ˌriːɪnˈdaɪt)
vb (tr)
to indict again
References in periodicals archive ?
357, 358-59 (1978) (holding that a prosecutor's plea offer, accompanied by a threat to reindict defendant as recidivist unless it was accepted, did not fall outside constitutional boundaries).
357, 364-65 (1978) (upholding a prosecutor's decision to reindict a defendant on heavier charges carrying a possible life sentence because the defendant had refused to take an offered plea bargain).
36) Although the majority seemed assured that the federal government would simply reindict the Ballards, (37) the prosecution may have been convinced by Justice Jackson's reasoning; in any event, no additional charges were filed and the "I Am" movement appears to have been thriving through at least 1950.
1998) (applying the frustration of purpose doctrine to permit the government to reindict the defendant); United States v.
First, it argued that the defendant was not a "prevailing party" under the Hyde Amendment because the government had the authority to reindict him and that dismissal without prejudice might rest on factors other than the government's improper behavior(157) Second, the government argued that the dismissal was not a "final judgment," and therefore, defendant's claim was premature.
247) In Torres, the court reaffirmed the appeals court's finding that where appellee was indicted for the felony offense of escape, and the trial court later dismissed his case for lack of prosecution, the state could not reindict appellee for the same offense.
Some have argued that Walsh's decision in October 1992 to reindict Caspar Weinberger, and in the course of that being made public, release evidence of Bush's involvement in a key meeting, hurt the president's reelection chances.