reinhabit

reinhabit

(ˌriːɪnˈhæbɪt)
vb
to inhabit or dwell again
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
This is even more difficult when combating insurgents; for example, a hospital may be used as a command center, but a week later the command center may have moved and the local population may have begun to reinhabit the facility.
I recognize that compulsion: I have felt the desire to reinhabit the empty stone foundation I encounter in what is now a thick forest, to see it whole again, to overcome the temporal gap between then and now.
These and other poets remain distant from the historical, mythical, and quasi-personal pasts that they can never quite reinhabit. But lyric as a genre has special cultural significance where Victorian memory is concerned; as realistic prose comes to dominate the literary scene, lyric is "mythologized as the purest and oldest of poetic genres and thus transformed into a nostalgic ideological marker." (56) The versions of literary history, of speakers' occluded pasts, and of readers' textual recollections that it generates, then, all involve memorable distortion or forgetting.
What did it say about property, the nature of space, and the once middle class neighborhood that it had been left open for people to reinhabit and use?
I'm wondering what it's like for you to reinhabit yourself from about forty-five years ago.
So when the couple heard that the design team behind many of their favorite properties, Reinhabit (re-inhabit, com), had bought a 1,650-square-foot house five doors down from the couple's rental, their curiosity was piqued.
(v) Although this law criminalized Palestinians' attempts to return home following the conflict, an estimated 10,000-15,000 still tried to reinhabit their land each year from 1949 to 1956 (Korn 2003).
awakes the urge to reinhabit, make anew or otherwise inquire into suspicion of loveliness and that it might be true (14) John Paul's vision of the artist makes this possibility readily conceivable, but not by establishing a definite relation of art to truth.
With such thunderous acceptance (a current GQ profile calls him ''the greatest comic talent of his generation''), is it tough to reinhabit the earlier, not-nearly-so-successful Louis C.K.