reinter

(redirected from reinterments)

reinter

(ˌriːɪnˈtɜː)
vb (tr)
to inter or bury (a body) again

reinter


Past participle: reinterred
Gerund: reinterring

Imperative
reinter
reinter
Present
I reinter
you reinter
he/she/it reinters
we reinter
you reinter
they reinter
Preterite
I reinterred
you reinterred
he/she/it reinterred
we reinterred
you reinterred
they reinterred
Present Continuous
I am reinterring
you are reinterring
he/she/it is reinterring
we are reinterring
you are reinterring
they are reinterring
Present Perfect
I have reinterred
you have reinterred
he/she/it has reinterred
we have reinterred
you have reinterred
they have reinterred
Past Continuous
I was reinterring
you were reinterring
he/she/it was reinterring
we were reinterring
you were reinterring
they were reinterring
Past Perfect
I had reinterred
you had reinterred
he/she/it had reinterred
we had reinterred
you had reinterred
they had reinterred
Future
I will reinter
you will reinter
he/she/it will reinter
we will reinter
you will reinter
they will reinter
Future Perfect
I will have reinterred
you will have reinterred
he/she/it will have reinterred
we will have reinterred
you will have reinterred
they will have reinterred
Future Continuous
I will be reinterring
you will be reinterring
he/she/it will be reinterring
we will be reinterring
you will be reinterring
they will be reinterring
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been reinterring
you have been reinterring
he/she/it has been reinterring
we have been reinterring
you have been reinterring
they have been reinterring
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been reinterring
you will have been reinterring
he/she/it will have been reinterring
we will have been reinterring
you will have been reinterring
they will have been reinterring
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been reinterring
you had been reinterring
he/she/it had been reinterring
we had been reinterring
you had been reinterring
they had been reinterring
Conditional
I would reinter
you would reinter
he/she/it would reinter
we would reinter
you would reinter
they would reinter
Past Conditional
I would have reinterred
you would have reinterred
he/she/it would have reinterred
we would have reinterred
you would have reinterred
they would have reinterred
Translations

reinter

[ˈriːɪnˈtɜːʳ] VTenterrar de nuevo
References in periodicals archive ?
Their reinterments were typically held on protected state land, or, in a few cases, near or on the sites from which archaeologists originally excavated them decades ago.
Given the lack of financial support to Indigenous communities for conducting reburials (Meara 2007; Wilson 2005), particularly when numerous reinterments are involved, the cost of utilising commercial geophysical survey companies to help locate appropriate sites would be prohibitive.
In some instances, the community desires that reinterment occurs as soon as possible, and this is carried out quickly wherever access to land with secure tenure can be obtained.
Regardless of the specific circumstances, Indigenous communities typically express the strong desire to not cause disturbance to their in situ ancestors during any reinterment event.
While Ngarrindjeri Elders discuss how and where to proceed with reinterment, the majority of the repatriated Old People are cared for in a temporary keeping place at Camp Coorong, a community run cultural education centre.
Elders expressed considerable concern that the reinterment should not disturb existing burials, and so arrangements were made to conduct a geophysical survey prior to the reburial to assist them in making an informed decision about where to position the new graves.
Nevertheless, on the basis of the geophysical survey results, an area with no evidence for prior disturbance was identified, the grave was subsequently dug without encountering any cultural material and the first Ngarrindjeri reburial ceremony and reinterment was successfully conducted on 26 September 2006 (see Figure 3).
The ceaseless reinterments in a big town churchyard meant, in any case, that you could not expect a grave site to be permanently set apart for its tenant.
Officially established more than 120 years ago, Arlington's headstones date back before the Civil War because of reinterments.