reinterrogation

reinterrogation

(ˌriːɪnˌtɛrəˈɡeɪʃən)
n
a second or new interrogation or inquiry
References in periodicals archive ?
477 (1981), permits reinterrogation of a suspect who has asked for counsel fourteen days after he has been released from custody); Cnty.
In consonance with the discursive politics of postmodernism (see Hutcheon 66), such reinterrogation paid attention not only to its negative effects, but also showed an interest in recovering the voices and discourse of all those who were traditionally marginalized from or oppressed by historical and political processes.
96 (1975) the Supreme Court held that reinterrogation of individuals who invoke their right to silence is permissible if officers wait a reasonable period of time.
And while Nancy and Lacoue-Labarthe wish to approach this as a political problem through a careful and consistent reinterrogation of the overflowing of this constitutive and liminal fold, psychoanalysis' strongest (or at any rate, its loudest) contemporary heir Slavoj Zizek thinks the possibility of a politics of the unconscious in a theoretical mode that espouses a certain exemplarity of method in excess of the incontinence of the limit.
L'emergence de ce que nous appelons souverainetes mouvantes a lieu dans un contexte ou l'on assiste a un veritable redeploiement des identites, avec en contrepoint une reinterrogation des frontieres.
Justice White wrote the Edwards opinion adopting a rigid bar on post-invocation reinterrogation.
The legal development is the Court's vigorous enforcement of the bar on reinterrogation of suspects who invoke the right to counsel.
See generally, Marcy Strauss, Reinterrogation, 22 HASTINGS CONST.
Claiming a prior invocation of his right to counsel when first arrested on the assault charge, Perkins argued that the undercover officer's question "have your ever `done' anyone" amounted to reinterrogation in violation of the rule established in Minnick.
1978) (restricting reinterrogation under the state constitution); State v.