rejuvenate

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re·ju·ve·nate

 (rĭ-jo͞o′və-nāt′)
tr.v. re·ju·ve·nat·ed, re·ju·ve·nat·ing, re·ju·ve·nates
1. To restore to youthful vigor or appearance; make young again.
2. To restore to an original or new condition: rejuvenate an old sofa.
3.
a. To stimulate (a stream) to renewed erosive activity, as by uplift of the land.
b. To develop youthful topographic features in (a previously leveled area).

[re- + Latin iuvenis, young; see yeu- in Indo-European roots + -ate.]

re·ju′ve·na′tion n.
re·ju′ve·na′tor (-tər) n.

rejuvenate

(rɪˈdʒuːvɪˌneɪt)
vb (tr)
1. to give new youth, restored vitality, or youthful appearance to
2. (Physical Geography) (usually passive) geography
a. to cause (a river) to begin eroding more vigorously to a new lower base level, usually because of uplift of the land
b. to cause (a land surface) to develop youthful features
[C19: from re- + Latin juvenis young]
reˌjuveˈnation n
reˈjuveˌnator n

re•ju•ve•nate

(rɪˈdʒu vəˌneɪt)

v. -nat•ed, -nat•ing. v.t.
1. to restore to youthful vigor, look, etc.; make young again.
2. to restore to a former state; make new again: to rejuvenate an old sofa.
3.
a. to renew the erosive power of (a stream), as by regional uplift.
b. to restore youthful topographic features to (a landscape), as by rejuvenated stream erosion.
v.i.
4. to undergo rejuvenation.
[1800–10; re- + Latin juven(is) young + -ate1]
re•ju`ve•na′tion, n.
re•ju′ve•na`tor, n.

rejuvenate


Past participle: rejuvenated
Gerund: rejuvenating

Imperative
rejuvenate
rejuvenate
Present
I rejuvenate
you rejuvenate
he/she/it rejuvenates
we rejuvenate
you rejuvenate
they rejuvenate
Preterite
I rejuvenated
you rejuvenated
he/she/it rejuvenated
we rejuvenated
you rejuvenated
they rejuvenated
Present Continuous
I am rejuvenating
you are rejuvenating
he/she/it is rejuvenating
we are rejuvenating
you are rejuvenating
they are rejuvenating
Present Perfect
I have rejuvenated
you have rejuvenated
he/she/it has rejuvenated
we have rejuvenated
you have rejuvenated
they have rejuvenated
Past Continuous
I was rejuvenating
you were rejuvenating
he/she/it was rejuvenating
we were rejuvenating
you were rejuvenating
they were rejuvenating
Past Perfect
I had rejuvenated
you had rejuvenated
he/she/it had rejuvenated
we had rejuvenated
you had rejuvenated
they had rejuvenated
Future
I will rejuvenate
you will rejuvenate
he/she/it will rejuvenate
we will rejuvenate
you will rejuvenate
they will rejuvenate
Future Perfect
I will have rejuvenated
you will have rejuvenated
he/she/it will have rejuvenated
we will have rejuvenated
you will have rejuvenated
they will have rejuvenated
Future Continuous
I will be rejuvenating
you will be rejuvenating
he/she/it will be rejuvenating
we will be rejuvenating
you will be rejuvenating
they will be rejuvenating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been rejuvenating
you have been rejuvenating
he/she/it has been rejuvenating
we have been rejuvenating
you have been rejuvenating
they have been rejuvenating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been rejuvenating
you will have been rejuvenating
he/she/it will have been rejuvenating
we will have been rejuvenating
you will have been rejuvenating
they will have been rejuvenating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been rejuvenating
you had been rejuvenating
he/she/it had been rejuvenating
we had been rejuvenating
you had been rejuvenating
they had been rejuvenating
Conditional
I would rejuvenate
you would rejuvenate
he/she/it would rejuvenate
we would rejuvenate
you would rejuvenate
they would rejuvenate
Past Conditional
I would have rejuvenated
you would have rejuvenated
he/she/it would have rejuvenated
we would have rejuvenated
you would have rejuvenated
they would have rejuvenated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.rejuvenate - cause (a stream or river) to erode, as by an uplift of the land
river - a large natural stream of water (larger than a creek); "the river was navigable for 50 miles"
provoke, stimulate - provide the needed stimulus for
2.rejuvenate - develop youthful topographical features; "the land rejuvenated"
change - undergo a change; become different in essence; losing one's or its original nature; "She changed completely as she grew older"; "The weather changed last night"
3.rejuvenate - make younger or more youthful; "The contact with his grandchildren rejuvenated him"
revitalize, regenerate - restore strength; "This food revitalized the patient"
age - make older; "The death of his child aged him tremendously"
4.rejuvenate - return to life; get or give new life or energy; "The week at the spa restored me"
reincarnate, renew - cause to appear in a new form; "the old product was reincarnated to appeal to a younger market"
resurrect, revive - restore from a depressed, inactive, or unused state; "He revived this style of opera"; "He resurrected the tango in this remote part of Argentina"
regenerate, renew - reestablish on a new, usually improved, basis or make new or like new; "We renewed our friendship after a hiatus of twenty years"; "They renewed their membership"
5.rejuvenate - become young again; "The old man rejuvenated when he became a grandfather"
regenerate - undergo regeneration

rejuvenate

verb revitalize, restore, renew, refresh, regenerate, breathe new life into, reinvigorate, revivify, give new life to, reanimate, make young again, restore vitality to He was advised that the Italian climate would rejuvenate him.

rejuvenate

verb
1. To impart renewed energy and strength to (a person):
2. To bring back to a previous normal condition:
3. To make new or as if new again:
Idiom: give a new look to.
Translations
يُجَدِّد شَباب ، يُعيد نَشاط
omladit se
forynge
megfiatalít
yngja
atjauninimasatjauninti
atjaunināt
omladiť
gençleştirmek

rejuvenate

[rɪˈdʒuːvɪneɪt] VTrejuvenecer

rejuvenate

[rɪˈdʒuːvəneɪt] vt [+ person] → rajeunir; [+ skin, cells] → rajeunir; [+ area] → moderniser

rejuvenate

vtverjüngen; (fig)erfrischen

rejuvenate

[rɪˈdʒuːvɪˌneɪt] vt(far) ringiovanire

rejuvenate

(rəˈdʒuːvəneit) verb
to make young again.
reˌjuveˈnation noun

rejuvenate

v. rejuvenecer; rejuvenecerse.

rejuvenate

vt rejuvenecer; to become rejuvenated rejuvenecerse
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