relationist

Related to relationist: Relationism

relationist

(rɪˈleɪʃənɪst)
n
a relative or relation
adj
of or relating to a doctrine maintaining the existence of relations between thingsof or relating to the theory that suggests that knowledge is conditioned by its sociocultural context; relativist
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Thomas does provide an interesting reading of Barrow as a modal relationist, mostly based on resolving a difficulty in a single passage, which is likely to attract attention.
Dagenais, Bernard, Profesia de relationist, Editura Polirom, Iasi, 2002
Thus the present paper can be seen as an indirect engagement with Fine's relationist proposal.
From a psychological perspective, Samuel Ben Israel distinguishes between the "intrapsychic" and the "relationist" perspectives comparing films which are with focus on one protagonist and on the character's goal-oriented actions moving chronologically from conflict to resolution in multi-protagonist films where group relationships are emphasized and characters' motivations discerned only episodically in their inter-actions with others within a non-enclosed narrative structure.
This relationist perspective of developmental processes just described involves a relativist interpretation of its outcomes, as these depend on the specific characteristics of the related components.
Samuel Ben Israel, developing a distinction in social psychology between the "intrapsychic" and the "relationist" perspective, compares the classical single-protagonist film to the multi-protagonist film.
Prima facie a Leibnizian relationist view of space and spacetime would seem more friendly to constructivism, since spacetime itself is viewed as a construction, a device for keeping track of geometric and kinematic relations among actual bodies.
[recall the Human Relationist view of the ordinary worker cited earlier].
As Kant argued, such a conception cannot account for the difference between left and right: A list of all possible pairs of points of a hand's surface and their respective distance to each other would give a full relationist description of that hand and yet leave orientation unspecified; that is, the description would be the same for a mirror-reversed exemplar of the 'same' hand.(39) Therefore, Kant concludes, the ground for the left-right distinction must lie outside the hand.
Once the federal government, as part of its New Deal, finally addressed the problem of health differentials, this black public health professional strata was able to articulate a "relationist" paradigm of black health.