relative clause


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Related to relative clause: Noun clause

relative clause

Relative clauses (also known as adjective or adjectival clauses) are dependent clauses that provide descriptive information about a noun or noun phrase. Relative clauses are introduced by either a relative pronoun or a relative adverb, and the information they provide can either be essential or nonessential to the completeness of the sentence.
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relative clause

n.
A dependent clause introduced by a relative pronoun, as which is downstairs in The dining room, which is downstairs, is too dark.

rel′ative clause′


n.
a subordinate clause that is introduced by a relative pronoun, adjective, or adverb, either expressed or deleted, and modifies an antecedent, as who saw you in That's the woman who saw you or (that) I wrote in Here's the letter (that) I wrote.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.relative clause - a clause introduced by a relative pronoun; "`who visits frequently' is a relative clause in the sentence `John, who visits frequently, is ill'"
clause - (grammar) an expression including a subject and predicate but not constituting a complete sentence
Translations
proposition relativeproposition subordonnée relative
References in periodicals archive ?
In the above example the Greek subject phrase [phrase omitted] is translated in CPA by a relative clause, [phrase omitted], where the demonstrative [phrase omitted] "this one" serves as the headword, followed by the relative [phrase omitted] "who." Since the relative clause neither begins nor ends the sentence, it cannot be left or right dislocated, but can be analyzed as the subject.
This means that a complex sentence offers the possibility for four functional types of dependent clauses: the relative clause postmodifies the noun phrase; the clausal subject, the clausal object and adverbial clause are dependent clauses which function as clause constituents (Payne 2011: 334).
and Hatch would be to [...] [AL, Ellis (1999: 687)] Nominal + Participle #9 Evidently, we obtained the results expected for a classical light wave where the [...] [PH, Gerry & Knight (2005: 140)] Nominal + Relative clause #10 [...] his work is motivated by the belief that 'Language does not occur in stray words or sentences, but in [...]' [AL, Widdowson (2004: 3)] Nominal + Gerund #11 [...] what study must be one of...
The two study questions were addressed through qualitative analysis as well as quantitative analysis of the frequencies of relative clause reformulation and frequencies of different reformulation procedures in the different age groups.
SUB--INST-DCS-hide--IMPF 3POSS-mother-PL.PO __ 'those that hide behind their mother('s skirts)' In a construction like this, the head of the relative clause is elided.
Relative Clause fragments have a slightly different formula from the subordinate clause fragments discussed earlier.
Logistic regression results showed that Passive and Passivized Object Relative Clause sentence structures served to correctly classify 80.4% of the cases.
Now we will analyse two examples the first representing a non-restrictive relative clause and the second a restrictive relative clause to see whether our hypotheses for structural Case assignment hold good or they behave differently for Pashto relative clauses:
These aspects include assignment of thematic roles in passive sentences and assignment of referents in relative clauses (Hesketh, 2006) and in those that contain clitic pronouns (see for a review van der Lely, 2004, 2005).
IA is not compatible with extra position of the relative clause, which is possible and quite frequent in other cases (see section 2).
Where the relative clause modifies a head noun in the subject complement position.

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