relaxant

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re·lax·ant

 (rĭ-lăk′sənt)
n.
1. A drug that causes muscle relaxation.
2. Something that helps one to relax: Taking a walk is a great relaxant after working all day.
3. An agent used to straighten curly hair; a relaxer.

re·lax′ant adj.

relaxant

(rɪˈlæksənt)
n
(Medicine) med a drug or agent that relaxes, esp one that relaxes tense muscles
adj
of, relating to, or tending to produce relaxation

re•lax•ant

(rɪˈlæk sənt)

adj.
1. of, pertaining to, or causing relaxation.
n.
2. a drug that relaxes, esp. one that lessens strain in muscle.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.relaxant - a drug that relaxes and relieves tension
drug - a substance that is used as a medicine or narcotic
muscle relaxant - a drug that reduces muscle contractility by blocking the transmission of nerve impulses or by decreasing the excitability of the motor end plate or by other actions
Adj.1.relaxant - tending to relax or relieve muscular or nervous tension; "a relaxant drug"
depressant - capable of depressing physiological or psychological activity or response by a chemical agent
Translations

relaxant

[rɪˈlæksənt] N (= drug) → relajante m

relaxant

n (Med) → Relaxans nt

relaxant

[rɪˈlæksənt] adj & n (Med) → calmante (m)

re·lax·ant

n. relajante, tranquilizante; droga que reduce la tensión.

relaxant

n relajante m; muscle — relajante muscular
References in periodicals archive ?
Because of reflex muscle spasm, muscle relaxants are frequently used either alone or in combination with analgesics.
Contract notice: Muscle relaxants (m03), anesthetics (n01), hypnotics and sedatives (n05c).
Out of all the relaxants, Suxamethonium is the only which is depolarizing and the rest being non-depolarizing muscle relaxants.
INTRODUCTION: Several clinical studies have reported that significant number of patients receiving non depolarizing muscle relaxants during general anesthesia show postoperative residual neuromuscular block when assessed by neuromuscular monitor in the recovery room.
Muscle relaxants were introduced into clinical practice in the early 1940s.
Our ED at the university pretty much doesn't hand out muscle relaxants anymore.
Six decades later, the debate between using or not using muscle relaxants is still open.
Central muscle relaxants (CMRs) are most often used for treating muscle spasticities of neurological origin, while their use for minor complaints, such as acute LBP, has been limited by their adverse CNS effects.
BRIDION is indicated for routine reversal of the commonly used muscle relaxants rocuronium or vecuronium and for immediate reversal of rocuronium in adults, and for routine reversal following rocuronium in children and adolescents (2-17 years of age).
She claimed they were muscle relaxants to be taken before a bogus doctor's check-up.
According to prescribing patterns, it appears that muscle relaxants are among the most effective medications for back pain, but they're more effective when used in combination with other medications.