relic

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rel·ic

 (rĕl′ĭk)
n.
1. Something that has survived the passage of time, especially an object or custom whose original culture has disappeared: "Corporal punishment was a relic of barbarism" (Cyril Connolly).
2. Something cherished for its age or historic interest.
3. An object kept for its association with the past; a memento.
4. An object of religious veneration, especially a piece of the body or a personal item of a saint.
5. or relics A corpse; remains.

[Middle English relik, object of religious veneration, from Old French relique, from Late Latin reliquiae, sacred relics, from Latin, remains, from reliquus, remaining, from relinquere, relīqu-, to leave behind; see relinquish.]

relic

(ˈrɛlɪk)
n
1. something that has survived from the past, such as an object or custom
2. something kept as a remembrance or treasured for its past associations; keepsake
3. (usually plural) a remaining part or fragment
4. (Eastern Church (Greek & Russian Orthodox)) RC Church Eastern Churches part of the body of a saint or something supposedly used by or associated with a saint, venerated as holy
5. (Roman Catholic Church) RC Church Eastern Churches part of the body of a saint or something supposedly used by or associated with a saint, venerated as holy
6. informal an old or old-fashioned person or thing
7. (plural) archaic the remains of a dead person; corpse
8. (Biology) ecology a less common term for relict1
[C13: from Old French relique, from Latin reliquiae remains, from relinquere to leave behind, relinquish]

rel•ic

(ˈrɛl ɪk)

n.
1. a surviving memorial of something past.
2. an object having interest by reason of its age or its association with the past.
3. a surviving trace of something: a custom that is a relic of paganism.
4. relics,
a. remaining parts or fragments.
b. the remains of a deceased person.
5. something kept in remembrance; souvenir; memento.
6. a body, body part, or personal object associated with a saint or martyr and preserved as worthy of veneration.
7. a once widespread linguistic form that survives in a limited area but is otherwise obsolete.
[1175–1225; Middle English < Old French relique < Latin reliquiae (pl.) remains (> Old English reliquias) =reliqu(us) remaining + -iae pl. n. suffix]
leftover, relic, relief - Before leftovers were called leftovers, they were called relics, and, before that, relief.
See also related terms for leftovers.

relic

A part of the body or something used or associated with a saint or other very important religious figure such as the Buddha.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.relic - an antiquity that has survived from the distant pastrelic - an antiquity that has survived from the distant past
antiquity - an artifact surviving from the past
archeological remains - a relic that has been excavated from the soil
2.relic - something of sentimental valuerelic - something of sentimental value  
object, physical object - a tangible and visible entity; an entity that can cast a shadow; "it was full of rackets, balls and other objects"
love-token - keepsake given as a token of love
party favor, party favour, favour, favor - souvenir consisting of a small gift given to a guest at a party

relic

plural noun
1. remains, bones, sacred objects, holy objects ancient Egyptian relics

relic

noun
A mark or remnant that indicates the former presence of something:
Translations
بَقِيَّه، أثَررُفات
relikviepamátka
levnrelikvie
pyhäinjäännösreliikki
ereklyerelikviaemlék
reliktas
paliekas
pamiatkarelikvia
relikvija
kutsal emanet/kalıntıtarihi kalıntıyadigâr

relic

[ˈrelɪk] N (Rel) → reliquia f (fig) → vestigio m

relic

[ˈrɛlɪk] n
(= sacred object) → relique f
[the past] → vestige m, relique f

relic

nÜberbleibsel nt, → Relikt nt; (Rel) → Reliquie f; a relic of or from the pastein Überbleibsel ntaus vergangener Zeit; an old relic (pej inf, = person) → ein alter Knochen (inf); (= car/wardrobe etc)ein vorsintflutlicher Karren/Schrank etc (pej inf)

relic

[ˈrɛlɪk] n (Rel) → reliquia (fig) (of the past) → retaggio

relic

(ˈrelik) noun
1. something left from a past time. relics of an ancient civilization.
2. something connected with, especially the bones of, a dead person (especially a saint).
References in classic literature ?
I have compared the silver coin to the Koh-i-noor, and in one sense it was even conventionally comparable, since by a historical accident it was at one time almost counted among the Crown jewels, or at least the Crown relics, until one of the royal princes publicly restored it to the shrine to which it was supposed to belong.
Here are the precious relics, and, oh, I pray you that you will handle them softly and with reverence, else had I rather left my unworthy bones here by the wayside."
Likewise, by way of preliminary, I desire to remind the reader, that while in the earlier geological strata there are found the fossils of monsters now almost completely extinct; the subsequent relics discovered in what are called the Tertiary formations seem the connecting, or at any rate intercepted links, between the antichronical creatures, and those whose remote posterity are said to have entered the Ark; all the Fossil Whales hitherto discovered belong to the Tertiary period, which is the last preceding the superficial formations.
The neighbourhood of the upper Thames is rich in Roman relics, and my surmise seemed to me a very probable one; but our serious young man, who is a bit of a geologist, pooh-poohed my Roman relic theory, and said it was clear to the meanest intellect (in which category he seemed to be grieved that he could not conscientiously include mine) that the thing the boy had found was the fossil of a whale; and he pointed out to us various evidences proving that it must have belonged to the preglacial period.
"Now I have got you," said Sancho; "in that case the fame of them who bring the dead to life, who give sight to the blind, cure cripples, restore health to the sick, and before whose tombs there are lamps burning, and whose chapels are filled with devout folk on their knees adoring their relics be a better fame in this life and in the other than that which all the heathen emperors and knights-errant that have ever been in the world have left or may leave behind them?"
"It contains my money, and other things that I prize far more highly--my mother's letters, and some family relics which I should be very sorry to lose.
``The fool,'' answered Wamba, raising the relics of a gammon of bacon, ``will take care to erect a bulwark against the knave.''
Two panels were entirely hidden under pen-and-ink sketches, Gouache landscapes and Audran engravings, relics of better times and vanished luxury.
Relics are not in my creed; but I fear you at moments--far more than you need fear me at present; and to lessen my fear, put your hand upon that stone hand, and swear that you will never tempt me--by your charms or ways."
I was much interested by finding on the terrace, at the height of eighty-five feet, embedded amidst the shells and much sea-drifted rubbish, some bits of cotton thread, plaited rush, and the head of a stalk of Indian corn: I compared these relics with similar ones taken out of the Huacas, or old Peruvian tombs, and found them identical in appearance.
I'd sleep a bit and then again go and kiss the relics, and there was such peace all around, such blessedness, that one don't want to come out, even into the light of heaven again."
Our chambers were always full of chemicals and of criminal relics which had a way of wandering into unlikely positions, and of turning up in the butter-dish or in even less desirable places.