religiosity


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re·li·gi·os·i·ty

 (rĭ-lĭj′ē-ŏs′ĭ-tē)
n.
1. The quality of being religious.
2. Excessive or affected piety.

re•li•gi•os•i•ty

(rɪˌlɪdʒ iˈɒs ɪ ti)

n.
1. the quality of being religious; piety; devoutness.
2. affected or excessive devotion to religion.
[1350–1400; religiosite < Latin religiōsitās <religiōsus religious]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.religiosity - exaggerated or affected piety and religious zeal
devoutness, religiousness - piety by virtue of being devout

religiosity

noun
A state of often extreme religious ardour:
Translations

religiosity

[rɪˌlɪdʒɪˈɒsɪtɪ] Nreligiosidad f

religiosity

nFrömmlertum nt
References in classic literature ?
Once I ventured gently to chaff her about this religiosity of hers.
Then a wave of religiosity passed through the school.
According to the theories of secularization, the economic development is associated with science, rationalism and modernity, while the underdevelopment of a society is associated with traditionalism and religiosity (Dogan 1998; Halman and Pettersson 2003; Norris and Inglehart 2011; Stark 1999).
According to the study of Choumanova, Wanat, Barrett and Koopman the use of religiosity as a coping strategy may facilitate the process of recovery [11].
In previous researches, less work has been done on intensity of religiosity and these studies did not explore the relationship between the intensity of religiosity and purchase intention by examining the mediating role of attitudes towards Islamic and conventional ways of advertisements and the resulting attitude towards brands.
The more than 200-year-old church in Marinduque's capital town of Boac is not only a cultural artifact but a 'symbol' of the province's deep religiosity.
One element of Chinese Catholic women's religiosity stands out: its tendency to be domestic in nature.
While many studies have shown religiosity can lower depressive symptoms the relationship between the two is still ambiguous.
In chapter four, Margolis measures the level of partisanship and church attendance among a student cohort in 1965, 1973, and 1982, to seek any difference in peoples' religiosity and partisanship.
More specifically, we explain how religiosity in the geographic region in which an organization is headquartered creates social norms of honesty and risk aversion in which executives live and make decisions (Cialdini & Goldstein, 2004; Halek & Eisenhauer, 2001; Kohlberg, 1984; Sunstein, 1996).
Though research in religion and spirituality within the field of psychology has been increasing (Piedmont, 2013), research on the impact of religiosity on academic outcomes is rare (Regnerus & Elder, 2003a).
Connie Svob, Ph.D., from Columbia University in New York City, and colleagues examined associations of parent and offspring religiosity with suicide ideation and attempts in offspring.