religious right


Also found in: Thesaurus, Acronyms, Wikipedia.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.religious right - United States political faction that advocates social and political conservativism, school prayer, and federal aid for religious groups and schools
right wing, right - those who support political or social or economic conservatism; those who believe that things are better left unchanged
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
In a free government the security for civil rights must be the same as that for religious rights. It consists in the one case in the multiplicity of interests, and in the other in the multiplicity of sects.
At length a rumor reached our shores that the Prince of Orange had ventured on an enterprise, the success of which would be the triumph of civil and religious rights and the salvation of New England.
In the wake of that election we've seen an avalanche of literature purporting to explain the revival of the religious right and its implications for the country.
The debate is futile not only because it gives legitimacy to the conservative Christian position, but also because the religious right has unfortunately succeeded in associating the term "Christian" with conservatism in the national psyche.
I do not consider myself part of the so-called "religious right." However, I did watch the show and was angered by the gross misrepresentation of the church and was greatly concerned about the potential negative impact that misrepresentation could have on the health and future of all churches and Christians.
"Activists on the religious right have no respect for truth," says Roger Lancaster, professor of anthropology and director of cultural studies at George Mason University in Fairfax, Va., and author of The Trouble With Nature: Sex in Science and Popular Culture.
American fundamentalists number in the tens of millions, but not all of them believe literally in this apocalyptic vision, cautions Joan Bokaer, an expert on the religious right and formerly of the Center for Religion, Ethics and Social Policy at Cornell University.
Key themes developed by Wilcox are that the Religious Right is neither a recent newcomer to American polices nor a simple, monolithic movement advocating an agreed-upon single policy agenda for the nation.
A barbaric act, informed by twisted religious fervor: Griffin is the stereotypical Religious Right adherent brought to life.
The religious Right scored many significant political gains last year.
These results, AU said, prove that the political prognosticators who pronounced the Religious Right a spent force after the 2008 elections spoke too soon.