religiousness


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Related to religiousness: religiosity, religious coping

re·li·gious

 (rĭ-lĭj′əs)
adj.
1. Having or showing belief in and reverence for God or a deity.
2. Of, concerned with, or teaching religion: a religious text.
3. Extremely scrupulous or conscientious: religious devotion to duty.
n. pl. religious
A member of a monastic order, especially a nun or monk.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin religiōsus, from religiō, religion; see religion.]

re·li′gious·ly adv.
re·li′gious·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.religiousness - piety by virtue of being devout
piety, piousness - righteousness by virtue of being pious
religiosity, religiousism, pietism, religionism - exaggerated or affected piety and religious zeal
2.religiousness - the quality of being extremely conscientious; "his care in observing the rules of good health amounted to a kind of religiousness"
conscientiousness - the quality of being in accord with the dictates of conscience
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

religiousness

noun
A state of often extreme religious ardour:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
تَدَيُّن
zbožnost
religiøsitet
trúrækni
pobožnosť
dindarlık

religiousness

[rɪˈlɪdʒəsnɪs] Nreligiosidad f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

religiousness

n (= piety)Frömmigkeit f; (fig: = conscientiousness) → Gewissenhaftigkeit f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

religion

(rəˈlidʒən) noun
1. a belief in, or the worship of, a god or gods.
2. a particular system of belief or worship. Christianity and Islam are two different religions.
reˈligious adjective
1. of religion. religious education; a religious leader/instructor.
2. following the rules, forms of worship etc of a religion. a religious man.
reˈligiously adverb
reˈligiousness noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
As to the excessive religiousness alleged against Miss Brooke, he had a very indefinite notion of what it consisted in, and thought that it would die out with marriage.
"I should think, Perry," I chided, "that a man of your professed religiousness would rather be at his prayers than cursing in the presence of imminent death."
'This largely matches the findings of recent research on Finnish religiousness. A certain undertone of religiousness or the meaningfulness of life is manifest in people's comments, but most people don't talk about religion directly.
Westphal develops also a rather original concept of religiousness, which, in his opinion, reproduces not only the specifics of understanding this phenomenon by various religious thinkers, but also opens the veil over its essence.
When will this forced religiousness end in India,' he had tweeted.
He said that one of these trends is ultra modernity, which comes from the West, and another - ultra religiousness which comes from the East.
The question is: How do spirituality and religiousness fit in this model?
Thus religion and religiousness are essentially God-consciousness and the physical, personal and institutionalized articulation of such a consciousness in everyday life.
Ajakaiye focuses on the differences that exist between godliness and religiousness in his poem, Fire in My Soul.
A review of 148 studies published in 2002, involving more than 98,000 subjects, sought to determine if a person's amount of religiousness had any effect on depression.