remembrance

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re·mem·brance

 (rĭ-mĕm′brəns)
n.
1.
a. The act or process of remembering.
b. The state of being remembered: holds him in fond remembrance.
2. Something serving to celebrate or honor the memory of a person or event; a memorial.
3. The length of time over which one's memory extends: events within my remembrance.
4. Something remembered; a reminiscence.
5. A souvenir.
6. remembrances Greetings: Please give my remembrances to your mother.

[Middle English, from Old French, from remembrer, to remember; see remember.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

remembrance

(rɪˈmɛmbrəns)
n
1. the act of remembering or state of being remembered
2. something that is remembered; reminiscence
3. a memento or keepsake
4. the extent in time of one's power of recollection
5.
a. the act of honouring some past event, person, etc
b. (as modifier): a remembrance service.
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

re•mem•brance

(rɪˈmɛm brəns)

n.
1. a retained mental impression; memory.
2. the act or fact of remembering.
3. the ability to remember.
4. the length of time over which memory extends.
5. the state of being remembered; commemoration.
6. something that serves to bring to or keep in mind some place, person, event, etc.; memento.
7. a gift given as a token of love or friendship.
8. remembrances, greetings; respects.
[1300–50; Middle English < Old French; see remember, -ance]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.remembrance - the ability to recall past occurrencesremembrance - the ability to recall past occurrences
retentiveness, retentivity, retention, memory - the power of retaining and recalling past experience; "he had a good memory when he was younger"
2.remembrance - a recognition of meritorious serviceremembrance - a recognition of meritorious service
epitaph - a summary statement of commemoration for a dead person
festschrift - a collection of writings published in honor of a scholar
credit, recognition - approval; "give her recognition for trying"; "he was given credit for his work"; "give her credit for trying"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

remembrance

noun
1. commemoration, memorial, testimonial They wore black in remembrance of those who had died.
2. souvenir, token, reminder, monument, relic, remembrancer (archaic), memento, keepsake As a remembrance, he left a photo album.
3. memory, recollection, thought, recall, recognition, retrospect, reminiscence, anamnesis He had clung to the remembrance of things past.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

remembrance

noun
1. An act or instance of remembering:
2. The power of retaining and recalling past experience:
3. Something, as a structure or custom, serving to honor or keep alive a memory:
4. Something that causes one to remember:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
تَذَكُّر
paměť
minde
muistaminenmuistimuistiinpanomuistikuvamuisto
minning
anmayâd etme

remembrance

[rɪˈmembrəns]
A. N (= remembering) → recuerdo m
remembrancesrecuerdos mpl
in remembrance ofen conmemoración de
I have no remembrance of itno lo recuerdo en absoluto
B. CPD Remembrance Day, Remembrance Sunday N (Brit) día en el que se recuerda a los caídos en las dos guerras mundiales POPPY DAY
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

remembrance

[rɪˈmɛmbrəns] n
(= memory) → souvenir m
(= memorial) → mémoire f
in remembrance of → en mémoire de garden of remembranceRemembrance Day n (British)(le jour de) l'Armistice m, le 11 novembre
on Remembrance Day → le jour de l'Armistice
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

remembrance

n
Erinnerung f (→ of an +acc); in remembrance ofzur Erinnerung an (+acc); I have no remembrance of thatich habe keinerlei Erinnerung daran
(= keepsake)Andenken nt (→ of an +acc)
remembrances pl (old, form, = greetings) → Empfehlungen pl
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

remembrance

[rɪˈmɛmbrns] n (frm) → ricordo, memoria
in remembrance of → in memoria di
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

remember

(riˈmembə) verb
1. to keep in the mind, or to bring back into the mind after forgetting for a time. I remember you – we met three years ago; I remember watching the first men landing on the moon; Remember to telephone me tonight; I don't remember where I hid it.
2. to reward or make a present to. He remembered her in his will.
3. to pass (a person's) good wishes (to someone). Remember me to your parents.
reˈmembrance noun
the act of remembering or reminding. a statue erected in remembrance of the dead.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Since then, I have been a mere disfigured piece of furniture between you both; having no eyes, no ears, no feelings, no remembrances. Moan?
Milady at these words, which recalled frightful remembrances, hung down her head with a suppressed groan.
I am trying to separate myself from remembrances--'her voice faltered; she paused to control herself--'from remembrances,' she resumed,
The table between the windows was covered with work-boxes and netting-boxes which had been given her at different times, principally by Tom; and she grew bewildered as to the amount of the debt which all these kind remembrances produced.
The more vividly my later remembrances of Miss Dunross were associated with the idea of an unutterable bodily affliction, the higher the noble nature of the woman seemed to rise in my esteem.
Children of neighboring families, their affection was older even than their school-days; it seemed an innate principle, interfused among all their sentiments and feelings, and not so much a distinct remembrance, as connected with their whole volume of remembrances.
In less than twenty-four hours, Emily had seen two women shrinking from secret remembrances of her father--which might well be guilty remembrances--innocently excited by herself!
My only other remembrances of the great festival are, That they wouldn't let me go to sleep, but whenever they saw me dropping off, woke me up and told me to enjoy myself.
In the whole of her subsequent manner, she traced the direction of a mind awakened to reasonable exertion; for no sooner had they entered their common sitting-room, than Marianne turned her eyes around it with a look of resolute firmness, as if determined at once to accustom herself to the sight of every object with which the remembrance of Willoughby could be connected.--She said little, but every sentence aimed at cheerfulness, and though a sigh sometimes escaped her, it never passed away without the atonement of a smile.
I would entertain myself in forming and directing the minds of hopeful young men, by convincing them, from my own remembrance, experience, and observation, fortified by numerous examples, of the usefulness of virtue in public and private life.
You must know, Bella, my dear, and Mr Rokesmith, that when I first named to my husband my thoughts of adopting a little orphan boy in remembrance of John Harmon, I further named to my husband that it was comforting to think that how the poor boy would be benefited by John's own money, and protected from John's own forlornness.'
He has been taunted more than once about the Diamond, by those who recollect his angry outbreak before the assault; but, as may easily be imagined, his own remembrance of the circumstances under which I surprised him in the armoury has been enough to keep him silent.