remoralization

remoralization

(riːˌmɒrəlaɪˈzeɪʃən) or

remoralisation

n
the act of instilling with morals again; the act of making moral again
References in periodicals archive ?
Stress could be reduced by decreasing negative emotional states; increasing resilience to stressors through support, remoralization, and self-efficacy; and addressing psychiatric comorbidity that increases relapse vulnerability.
Between the ride and the story: Illness and remoralization. In A.
The informing social narrative for contemporary food documentaries is, as noted above, a new morality, or remoralization, of consumption in recent years through notions of consumer activism or ethical consumption more broadly.
Just as other considerations of cultural background should be respectfully considered, so should the clients' R/S commitments (Griffith & Griggs, 2001) as these interactions can provide hope, remoralization, and a shared formation and language of their lived experiences (Rosenfeld, 2010).
In summary, we do not see here any commitment to systematic redistribution but a plan for the remoralization of the economy at the individual level.
Kennedy, The Jena Six, Mass Incarceration, and the Remoralization of Civil Rights, 44 HARV.
She concludes by emphasizing reforms in terms of reculturation, restructuring, and remoralization.
(Rock-and-roll, in contrast, is here to stay, even if now sung by geriatric patients forever in blue jeans.) Murray does a masterly job contrasting the remoralization of Belmont with the demoralization of Fishtown.
Obama echoes the call of some of our keenest social critics for a remoralization of politics and society.
Finally, we summarize the medicalization and remoralization that occurred as a response to the advent of HIV/AIDS.
Frank approaches life writing as an advocate for an "understanding of personal narratives of illness as acts of remoralization" (176).