remotivate

remotivate

(riːˈməʊtɪˌveɪt)
vb (tr)
to motivate again
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
We're in the final now and determined to win to put it simply," Cisse told reporters Thursday."The defeat in the group allowed us to remotivate ourselves and become stronger.
"When we're trying to attract and sign players and remotivate the players we inherited, it's important they see we're trying to make the place better.
What strategies did participants employ to remotivate themselves?
The third was created by a player who wanted to leave in January but Silva has managed to remotivate Idrissa Gueye whose performances since the close of the window have been excellent.
Having surpassed their target for the campaign which was survival and 40 points it has clearly been difficult for the United squad to remotivate themselves to go again.
Having surpassed their target for the campaign - which was survival and 40 points - it has clearly been difficult for the United squad to remotivate themselves to go again.
Whatever the game plan turns out to be, what is clear, is that after the dark few years that followed the 2010 worlds, these players are really passionate to play for Germany again -- something that ME-ller alluded to when asked how they had managed to remotivate themselves after the US got the equalizer.
Mainstream producers should also 'remotivate' themselves to qualify for the inclusion by vamping up their standards and coming up with popular blockbusters that also have something to say.
"Coming into Wimbledon, I knew that mentally it wasn't going to be easy remotivate myself.
Hopefully all those lengthy school holidays should help to remotivate them.
If some resisted it through a refinement of late-modernist painting, others undertook a "search for the motivated" in the sheer physicality of new materials and processes or in the sheer actuality of the body of the artist and the site of the work.5 Ironically, even as this latter project sought to remotivate and to reground art, to render its making and meaning more transparent to its audience, its effect was often the opposite: to make art appear more arbitrary, rarefied, and illegible.
It is imperative that colleges develop strategies to avoid these inequities and in the process somehow find a way to remotivate those who simply do their jobs, but no more.