remotivation


Also found in: Medical.

remotivation

(ˌriːməʊtɪˈveɪʃən)
n
a group therapy technique used to encourage withdrawn mentally ill patients to develop communication, social, and vocational skills and to interact with their environment
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, even lexicalized (seemingly exocentric) compounds can become reanalysed and, therefore, remotivated by speakers and possess some degree of compositionality and analysability--fundamentally questioning their "exocentric" nature (after all, the reanalysis or remotivation of honeymoon in the forms of babymoon, familymoon, etc.
User's manual for remotivation process: Progressive intervention for individuals with severe volitional challenges.
Indeed, many of Kaushik's remarks throughout the book (including his welcome emphasis on Merleau-Ponty's middle works, his careful assessment of Merleau-Ponty's remotivation of a host of Husserlian concepts to his new purposes, and the insistence on the overcoming of ontological difference) seem to support this reading hypothesis.
35-42), mais nous nous interessons surtout a la remotivation de cette reference (24).
He also views the antiglobalization and anti-Bush/Republican/War in Iraq rallies of recent years as containing "the ethical energy for a remotivation of politics and future democratic organisation" (p.
We should rather, I think, consider further how the text may suggest a remotivation of narrative through narration and the need for it.
The individual papers that follow address a wide range of topics, from grammaticalization of syntax into morphology, and morphologization of phonology, through analogical change, remotivation and reinterpretation, lexicalization and demotivation, and changes in productivity, to borrowing and caique formation, pidginization, creolization, and language death, and reconstruction.
As far as the poetry written in Spanish is concerned, some poets from the 1930s to the present have incorporated into their works a revolutionary discourse based on the remotivation of Renaissance, Baroque, Modernista, and Surrealist poetic traditions.
By dealing primarily with the strengths of the client, and by following simple steps which can be performed by any trained health professional, social worker, relative or technician, remotivation therapy is very useful in group settings and with noncommunicative clients as a away of preparing them for more advanced therapies.
Nothing could be more typical of Klein's constant balancing act between, on the one hand, the radicality of his clownish demystifications (here, his demonstration of the arbitrariness of market value) and, on the other, his recourse to a romantic mystification, resting on a traditional conception of art and "inspiration" (here, the ritualistic remotivation of his apparently arbitrary pricing by signifying that each work was actually the vessel of a unique and immaterial "pictorial sensibility").
The eleven facilitation techniques included leisure education, social skills training, stress management, resocialization, cognitive retraining, therapeutic community, group therapy, sensory stimulation, reality orientation, and remotivation.
In a sense, Williams lowers the metaphorical character of the term "dance" insofar as the "act" of interpretation to which he refers is as much an affective and kinesthetic remotivation of the object as it is a mental activity.