rendering

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ren·der·ing

 (rĕn′dər-ĭng)
n.
1. A depiction or interpretation, as in painting or music.
2. A drawing in perspective of a proposed structure.
3. A translation: a rendering of Cicero's treatises into English.
4. A coat of plaster or cement applied to a masonry surface.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

rendering

(ˈrɛndərɪŋ)
n
1. the act or an instance of performing a play, piece of music, etc
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a translation of a text from a foreign language
3. (Building) Also called: rendering coat or render a coat of plaster or cement mortar applied to a surface
4. (Architecture) a perspective drawing showing an architect's idea of a finished building, interior, etc
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ren•der•ing

(ˈrɛn dər ɪŋ)

n.
1. an interpretation of a dramatic part or a musical composition.
2. a translation.
3. a representation of a building, interior, etc., executed in perspective.
[1400–50]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rendering - a performance of a musical composition or a dramatic role etc.; "they heard a live rendition of three pieces by Schubert"
performance, public presentation - a dramatic or musical entertainment; "they listened to ten different performances"; "the play ran for 100 performances"; "the frequent performances of the symphony testify to its popularity"
2.rendering - an explanation of something that is not immediately obvious; "the edict was subject to many interpretations"; "he annoyed us with his interpreting of parables"; "often imitations are extended to provide a more accurate rendition of the child's intended meaning"
broad interpretation, judicial activism - an interpretation of the U.S. constitution holding that the spirit of the times and the needs of the nation can legitimately influence judicial decisions (particularly decisions of the Supreme Court)
explanation - thought that makes something comprehensible
3.rendering - the act of interpreting something as expressed in an artistic performance; "her rendition of Milton's verse was extraordinarily moving"
reinterpretation - a new or different interpretation
spin - a distinctive interpretation (especially as used by politicians to sway public opinion); "the campaign put a favorable spin on the story"
performance - the act of presenting a play or a piece of music or other entertainment; "we congratulated him on his performance at the rehearsal"; "an inspired performance of Mozart's C minor concerto"
4.rendering - a written communication in a second language having the same meaning as the written communication in a first languagerendering - a written communication in a second language having the same meaning as the written communication in a first language
mistranslation - an incorrect translation
crib, pony, trot - a literal translation used in studying a foreign language (often used illicitly)
retroversion - translation back into the original language; "the teacher translated Latin texts into English which he gave to his students for retroversion"
subtitle, caption - translation of foreign dialogue of a movie or TV program; usually displayed at the bottom of the screen
supertitle, surtitle - translation of the words of a foreign opera (or choral work) projected on a screen above the stage
written account, written record - a written document preserving knowledge of facts or events
5.rendering - a coat of stucco applied to a masonry wall
coating, coat - a thin layer covering something; "a second coat of paint"
6.rendering - perspective drawing of an architect's design
drawing - a representation of forms or objects on a surface by means of lines; "drawings of abstract forms"; "he did complicated pen-and-ink drawings like medieval miniatures"
7.rendering - giving in acknowledgment of obligation
defrayal, defrayment, payment - the act of paying money
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

rendering

noun recitation, performance, interpretation, recital, rendition, depiction a rendering of Verdi's Requiem
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

rendering

noun
1. One's artistic conception as shown by the way in which something such as a dramatic role or musical composition is rendered:
2. A restating of something in other, especially simpler, words:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

rendering

[ˈrendərɪŋ] N (= translation) → traducción f; [of song, role] → interpretación f
her rendering of the sonatasu interpretación de la sonata
an elegant rendering of Machadouna elegante versión de Machado
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

rendering

[ˈrɛndərɪŋ] n
(= performance) [play, poem, piece of music] → interprétation f
(CONSTRUCTION)enduit m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

rendering

n
Wiedergabe f; (in writing) → Übertragung f; (of piece of music, poem)Vortrag m
(esp Brit, Build) → Putz m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

rendering

[ˈrɛndrɪŋ] n (translation) → traduzione f; (of song, role) → interpretazione f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
On a comparison of this extent with that of several countries in Europe, the practicability of rendering our system commensurate to it appears to be demonstrable.
To have taken all who offered themselves would have been an injury to the owners of the ships, by rendering them unable to continue their voyage; we therefore accepted only of a few.
With its daring imagery, grave magnificence of language and solemn thought, it is nothing less than Elizabethan, and only the masters of that age could have done it justice in the rendering.
This instrument was designed for the purpose of rendering visible on the surface of the moon any object exceeding nine feet in diameter.
Nor do I doubt, while I make their interest the great rule of my writings, they will unanimously concur in supporting my dignity, and in rendering me all the honour I shall deserve or desire.
The tragedies of most of our modern poets fail in the rendering of character; and of poets in general this is often true.
Some mothers would have insisted on their daughter's accepting so good an offer on the first overture; but I could not reconcile it to myself to force Frederica into a marriage from which her heart revolted, and instead of adopting so harsh a measure merely propose to make it her own choice, by rendering her thoroughly uncomfortable till she does accept him--but enough of this tiresome girl.
The preceding relative positions of himself and Lucie were reversed, yet only as the liveliest gratitude and affection could reverse them, for he could have had no pride but in rendering some service to her who had rendered so much to him.
The disciplined armies always kept on foot on the continent of Europe, though they bear a malignant aspect to liberty and economy, have, notwithstanding, been productive of the signal advantage of rendering sudden conquests impracticable, and of preventing that rapid desolation which used to mark the progress of war prior to their introduction.
His majesty Charles II., to whom I have had the honor of rendering some services -- I may tell you, my lord, my life has been passed in such occupations -- King Charles II., then, who wishes to honor me with some kindness, desires me to be presented to her royal highness the Princess Henrietta, his sister, to whom I shall, perhaps, have the good fortune to be of service hereafter.
And the escort, as if afraid, in the grievous condition they themselves were in, of giving way to the pity they felt for the prisoners and so rendering their own plight still worse, treated them with particular moroseness and severity.
He overwhelmed me with the wildest expressions of affection--exclaimed passionately, in his exaggerated Italian way, that he would hold his life henceforth at my disposal--and declared that he should never be happy again until he had found an opportunity of proving his gratitude by rendering me some service which I might remember, on my side, to the end of my days.