REO

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reo

(ˈriːəʊ)
n
(Languages) NZ a language
[Māori]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

REO

A car made by the REO Car Company of Lansing, MI from 1904 through 1936. The name REO came from the initials of Ransom E. Olds, founder of the company.
1001 Words and Phrases You Never Knew You Didn’t Know by W.R. Runyan Copyright © 2011 by W.R. Runyan
References in periodicals archive ?
No, Reos Lite is not an IoT bulb, like the Philips Hue.
To illustrate why REOs are legally unsound, the judges noted Quincy's REO required one apprentice graduate within the 12 months prior to a company submitting a bid, while Fall River's had required the graduation of two apprentices annually for the three years prior to a bid.
We've seen many astute investors acquire REOs that can earn a positive rental income in the short term with a longer-term exit strategy to sell for a profit when home prices appreciate," said Tom O'Grady, Pro Teck Valuation Services' chief executive officer.
Here are a few important tips for buyers interested in REOs offered by RE/MAX agents with extensive experience in that segment of the housing market.
The game was played in glorious sunshine as Aintree Village took the game to Reos playing some neat football but without troubling the Reos keeper.
This includes homes that have been repossessed by banks or investors after a foreclosure, so-called real-estate owned (REO) properties, which accounted for just under two-thirds of these distressed sales.
"This sale will provide investors with an opportunity to acquire loan and REO assets for significant discounts to value."
The drop in REOs is behind the remarkable turn-around in Phoenix's home prices.
0n April 4, the Washington, D.C.-based National Fair Housing Alliance (NFHA) released findings from an undercover investigation into potential disparities in the levels of maintenance and marketing done for real estate-owned (REO) properties in neighborhoods of color.
"The new-home market has all but dried up with the recent recession, but renovated REOs provide better, safer housing options today," claims Eck.
Reacting to this trend, an increasing number of communities are instituting land banks--quasi-public entities that rehabilitate, repurpose or demolish REOs that they get from investors and servicers at deep discounts.