repercussive


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re·per·cus·sion

 (rē′pər-kŭsh′ən, rĕp′ər-)
n.
1. An often indirect effect, influence, or result that is produced by an event or action.
2. A recoil, rebounding, or reciprocal motion after impact.
3. A reflection, especially of sound.

[Middle English repercussioun, from Old French repercussion, from Latin repercussiō, repercussiōn-, from repercussus, past participle of repercutere, to cause to rebound : re-, re- + percutere, to strike; see percuss.]

re′per·cus′sive adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
Olisa Agbakoba, while expressing dissatisfaction with the government's lackadaisical attitude to the issue, buttressed Danjuma's view, citing the weird circumstances in which some Dapchi schoolgirls were abducted by Boko with a conclusion that 'Nobody can trust the army anymore.' On its part, the Middle Belt Youth Council lamented that Nigeria had become 'the choice sport of Fulani herdsmen without any repercussive action by the Nigerian government.'
The category involved with consists of a new way of producing generalized and reciprocal suspicion, which seeks to "capture" subjects and their relations by means of a repercussive and verifiable discourse.
Repercussive impediments have compromised the collaborative mission of libraries and information organizations: to improve usability and retrieve relevant content.
(95) Therefore, while the impact of these objections is likely limited, the effects of having called into question the United States' reservations under CAT could have repercussive effects for non-litigation focused advocacy at the Committee Against Torture.
If I know the structure of the world and I am capable of understanding how its parts are imbricated and how some elements are repercussive upon others, then I can predict rules of behavior closely adjusted to reality.
2016 "A Twenty Hour a Day Job': The Repercussive Effects of Frequent Low-Level Criminal Justice Involvement on Family Life." Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 665(1): 63-79.