repertoire


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rep·er·toire

 (rĕp′ər-twär′)
n.
1. The stock of songs, plays, operas, readings, or other pieces that a player or company is prepared to perform.
2. The class of compositions in a genre: has excellent command of the chanteuse repertoire.
3. The range or number of skills, aptitudes, or special accomplishments of a particular person or group.

[French répertoire, from Old French, from Late Latin repertōrium; see repertory.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

repertoire

(ˈrɛpəˌtwɑː)
n
1. all the plays, songs, operas, or other works collectively that a company, actor, singer, dancer, etc, has prepared and is competent to perform
2. the entire stock of things available in a field or of a kind: the comedian's repertoire of jokes was becoming stale.
3. (Theatre) in repertoire denoting the performance of two or more plays, ballets, etc, by the same company in the same venue on different evenings over a period of time: "Nutcracker" returns to Covent Garden over Christmas in repertoire with "Giselle".
[C19: from French, from Late Latin repertōrium inventory; see repertory]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

rep•er•toire

(ˈrɛp ərˌtwɑr, -ˌtwɔr)

n.
1. all the works that a performing company or artist is prepared to present.
2. the entire stock of works in a particular artistic field: the theatrical repertoire.
3. the skills, techniques, etc., used in a particular field or occupation.
[1840–50; < French < Late Latin repertōrium catalogue. See repertory]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.repertoire - the entire range of skills or aptitudes or devices used in a particular field or occupation; "the repertory of the supposed feats of mesmerism"; "has a large repertory of dialects and characters"
aggregation, collection, accumulation, assemblage - several things grouped together or considered as a whole
2.repertoire - a collection of works (plays, songs, operas, ballets) that an artist or company can perform and do perform for short intervals on a regular schedule
aggregation, collection, accumulation, assemblage - several things grouped together or considered as a whole
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

repertoire

noun range, list, stock, supply, store, collection, repertory, repository an impressive repertoire of funny stories
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

repertoire

[ˈrepətwɑːʳ] N [of songs, jokes] → repertorio m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

repertoire

[ˈrɛpərtwɑːr] n
[actor, musician] → répertoire m
(fig)répertoire m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

repertoire

n (Theat, Mus) → Repertoire nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

repertoire

[ˈrɛpətwɑːʳ] nrepertorio
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Nor did the place lose money, for no one left, and the crowd increased to standing room as Michael went through his repertoire of "God Save the King," "Sweet Bye and Bye," "Lead, Kindly Light," "Home, Sweet Home," and "Shenandoah."
Young Jefferson only learnt to play one tune on those bagpipes; but I never heard any complaints about the insufficiency of his repertoire - none whatever.
He was deaf to the waltzes; they grew fainter and fainter; the discomfited performer left the huge instrument presently; and though her three friends performed some of the loudest and most brilliant new pieces of their repertoire, she did not hear a single note, but sate thinking, and boding evil.
Shaw considered her "sweet songs" quite unfit for a fashionable young lady's repertoire. "Where is your room?" asked Maud.
M2 PRESSWIRE-August 19, 2019-: Immune Repertoire Sequencing Market to Surpass US$ 185 Million by 2026 | Synthesis And Healthcare Experts Reviews
Favorite Piano Repertoire: From the 17th, 18th, 19th and 20th Centuries, Book One and Book Two
If you have published recent research in singing, voice pedagogy, voice science, vocal repertoire, pedagogic methodology, or other topics of interest to the membership of NATS, please send citations and abstracts to Donald Simonson at drs@iastate.edu for review and possible inclusion in future columns.
La mediatheque de la Cite de la musique vient de numeriser et mettre en ligne le repertoire de references de partitions [much less than] 10 ans avec la contrebasse [much greater than].
This study aims to build a predictive framework that explains how specific structural characteristics of the firm's repertoire (set) of competitive actions carried out in a given time period impacts the stock market's reaction to the firm's observed strategy.
The origin of media repertoires is rooted in the term "channel repertoire," which refers to "the set of channels watched regularly by an individual or household" (Heeter, 1985, p.

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