replacement therapy


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replacement therapy

n.
The administration of a natural or synthetic substance that compensates for a lack or deficiency caused by inadequate nutrition, certain organic dysfunctions, or loss, as from disease or surgery, of a body organ or tissue that normally produces the substance.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
For women who had used hormone replacement therapy, the overall risk of epithelial ovarian cancer was elevated (odds ratio, 1.4), as were the risks of developing the two most common types of ovarian tumors, serous (1.5) and endometrioid (1.4).
The patient had been taking thyroid hormone replacement therapy and was otherwise asymptomatic.
Law firms around the country have established web sites to disseminate information on hormone replacement therapy and screen possible claimants.
On July 24, 2002, Congresswoman Barbara Lee (D-CA) introduced the Hormone Replacement Therapy Alternative Treatment Fairness Act (H.R.
Women who take combined hormone replacement therapy after menopause increase their risk of breast cancer, stroke and heart disease, U.S.
The law will require individual and group health insurance plans to cover hormone replacement therapy and contraceptive drugs, devices, and services approved by the Food and Drug Administration.
In addition to memory loss, the technologies also include using plant estrogens in hormone replacement therapy and in preventing endometriosis with plant estrogens.
A proportion of such persons will have or develop renal failure requiring renal replacement therapy (hemodialysis or continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis [CAPD]).
HORMONE replacement therapy can increase the chances of breast cancer in women over 50, according to a top surgeon.
A SCHEME to improve access to nicotine replacement therapy has been extended, making it easier for smokers to kick the habit.
A national study, the Heart and Estrogen-progestin Replacement Study (HERS), evaluated, as part of its research, the effect of hormone replacement therapy on stroke incidence and death in postmenopausal women.
Public Health Minister Yvette Cooper said: 'We know that 70 per cent of smokers want to give up and nicotine replacement therapy is an effective treatment that doubles rates for people giving up.