replete

(redirected from repletely)
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re·plete

 (rĭ-plēt′)
adj.
1. Abundantly supplied; abounding: a stream replete with trout; an apartment replete with Empire furniture.
2. Filled to satiation; gorged.
3. Usage Problem Complete: a computer system replete with color monitor, printer, and software.
n.
A specialized worker in a honey ant colony that stores food in its distensible abdomen for later use by other members of the colony.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin replētus, past participle of replēre, to refill : re-, re- + plēre, to fill; see pelə- in Indo-European roots.]

re·plete′ness n.
Usage Note: Replete means "abundantly supplied" and is not generally accepted as a synonym for complete.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

replete

(rɪˈpliːt)
adj (usually postpositive)
1. (often foll by with) copiously supplied (with); abounding (in)
2. having one's appetite completely or excessively satisfied by food and drink; stuffed; gorged; satiated
[C14: from Latin replētus, from replēre to refill, from re- + plēre to fill]
reˈpletely adv
reˈpleteness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

re•plete

(rɪˈplit)

adj.
1. abundantly supplied: a speech replete with humor.
2. stuffed with food and drink.
[1350–1400; Middle English repleet < Middle French replet < Latin replētus, past participle of replēre to fill up =re- re- + plēre to fill, akin to plēnus full1]
re•plete′ly, adv.
re•plete′ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.replete - fill to satisfaction; "I am sated"
ingest, consume, have, take in, take - serve oneself to, or consume regularly; "Have another bowl of chicken soup!"; "I don't take sugar in my coffee"
cloy, pall - cause surfeit through excess though initially pleasing; "Too much spicy food cloyed his appetite"
Adj.1.replete - filled to satisfaction with food or drink; "a full stomach"
nourished - being provided with adequate nourishment
2.replete - (followed by `with')deeply filled or permeated; "imbued with the spirit of the Reformation"; "words instinct with love"; "it is replete with misery"
full - containing as much or as many as is possible or normal; "a full glass"; "a sky full of stars"; "a full life"; "the auditorium was full to overflowing"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

replete

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

replete

adjective
1. Full of animation and activity:
2. Completely filled:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

replete

[rɪˈpliːt] ADJ (liter) → repleto, lleno (with de)
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

replete

[rɪˈpliːt] adj
(= well-fed) → rassasié(e)
replete with → rassasié(e) de
(= well supplied) → rempli(e)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

replete

adj (form)reichlich versehen or ausgestattet (with mit); (= well-fed) persongesättigt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

replete

[rɪˈpliːt] adj (frm) replete (with)sazio/a (di)
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

replete

a. repleto-a, lleno-a en exceso.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012