repressed


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Related to repressed: Repressed anger, Repressed memories

re·press

 (rĭ-prĕs′)
v. re·pressed, re·press·ing, re·press·es
v.tr.
1. To hold back or prevent by an act of volition: couldn't repress a smirk.
2.
a. To put down or subdue by force: repress a rebellion.
b. To end, limit, or restrain, as by intimidation or other action: repress a heresy; repress inflation.
3. Psychology To exclude (painful or disturbing memories, for example) automatically or unconsciously from the conscious mind.
4. Biology
a. To prevent (the transcription of a gene or the synthesis of a protein) by the combination of a protein with an operator gene.
b. To prevent or limit the synthesis of (a protein).
v.intr.
To take repressive action.

[Middle English repressen, from Latin reprimere, repress- : re-, re- + premere, to press; see per- in Indo-European roots.]

re·press′i·bil′i·ty n.
re·press′i·ble adj.
Usage Note: Repress and suppress have similar meanings, but there are subtle differences that are worth paying attention to. Both share the general sense of holding back or subduing something, but repress suggests keeping something under control to maintain or regulate order, while suppress suggests a more active curtailment, an active fight against an opposing force. Thus, The government repressed the rebellion implies that the government always maintained control and that the rebellious forces never posed a serious threat to governmental power before being put down, while The government suppressed the rebellion suggests that a significant rebellion was under way and that the government had to react strongly to put an end to it. Similarly, one might repress (rather than suppress) a smirk in order to maintain a serious appearance, and one would take a medicine that suppresses (rather than represses) a cough in order to reduce its severity. · Both words also see use in psychology, and here a similar distinction prevails. Repress generally means "to exclude painful or disturbing memories automatically or unconsciously from the conscious mind." Suppress means "to exclude unacceptable desires or thoughts deliberately from the mind." Using repress to express a conscious effort, as in For years he tried to repress his frightful memories, is thus incorrect.

repressed

(rɪˈprɛst)
adj
(of a person) repressing feelings, instincts, desires, etc
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.repressed - characterized by or showing the suppression of impulses or emotions; "her severe upbringing had left her inhibited"; "a very inhibited young man, anxious and ill at ease"; "their reactions were partly the product of pent-up emotions"; "repressed rage turned his face scarlet"
inhibited - held back or restrained or prevented; "in certain conditions previously inhibited conditioned reactions can reappear"

repressed

adjective
1. inhibited, frustrated, suppressed a sexually repressed 30-year-old woman
2. suppressed, held in, restrained, inhibited, held back, bottled up an effective outlet for repressed emotions
Translations

repressed

[rɪˈprest] ADJreprimido

repressed

[rɪˈprɛst] adjrefoulé(e)
sexually repressed → sexuellement refoulé(e)

repressed

adjunterdrückt; (Psych) → verdrängt

repressed

[rɪˈprɛst] adjrepresso/a
References in classic literature ?
Instead of looking for a physical defect in the brain, those who treat delusions look for the repressed desire which has found this contorted mode of expression.
It is not necessary to suppose, as Freud seems to do, that every unconscious wish was once conscious, and was then, in his terminology, "repressed" because we disapproved of it.
They suppose that when wishes are repressed they are repressed into the 'unconscious,' and that this mysterious censor stands at the trapdoor lying between the conscious and the unconscious.
She lost all concern for him in finding herself thus selected as the object of such idle and frivolous gallantry; and while she steadily repressed it, could not but feel the reproof contained in his believing, that however long, and for whatever cause, his attentions had been withdrawn, her vanity would be gratified, and her preference secured at any time by their renewal.
He had been able to repress every disrespectful word; but the flashing eye, the gloomy and troubled brow, were part of a natural language that could not be repressed,--indubitable signs, which showed too plainly that the man could not become a thing.
In the "Interrogations" series, for example, all the resources of painting foreclosed by modernism erupt in images of the repressed underbelly of American imperial power; here a formal repression opens up the potential to image that which cannot be imaged.
In both films a rakish journalist (Ewan McGregor channels Curtis) woos a repressed, neurotic author (Renee Zellweger in for Wood) to debunk her popular how-to book on assertive female sexuality.
"I don't know if I was repressed or what, but being gay never even crossed my mind," recalls Ryan McGinley about his rowdy teen years growing up in New Jersey and raising hell in Manhattan.
McCarthy's work has always engaged and encouraged an investigation of the repressed and its return.
Shortly before the Gulf War she started grappling with her gender identity, a concern she had long repressed. Born biologically male, she finally started exploring whether she would be more comfortable living as a female.
But where Clark's objectives vis-a-vis River Phoenix, Matt Dillon, and Kartheiser involve endangering their natural eroticism with his patented mixture of identification and repressed lust, Korine's intentions regarding Culkin seem rather a consensual, even shy attempt to locate the former child star's current cultural value.
Robin's discovery is that he can't ever be normal, and his realization unfolds with a hyperclarity that scrutinizes the complex tangle of emotions--rage, love, repressed desire--that govern suburban relationships.