repressive


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re·pres·sive

 (rĭ-prĕs′ĭv)
adj.
Causing or inclined to cause repression: a repressive dictatorship.

re·pres′sive·ly adv.
re·pres′sive·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

repressive

(rɪˈprɛsɪv)
adj
1. acting to control, suppress, or restrain
2. subjecting people, a society, etc, to a state of subjugation
reˈpressively adv
reˈpressiveness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

re•pres•sive

(rɪˈprɛs ɪv)

adj.
tending or serving to repress: repressive laws.
re•pres′sive•ly, adv.
re•pres′sive•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.repressive - restrictive of action; "a repressive regime"; "an overly strict and inhibiting discipline"
restrictive - serving to restrict; "teenagers eager to escape restrictive home environments"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

repressive

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

repressive

adjective
Serving to restrain forcefully:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
قَمْعي، كَبْتي
potlačovací
elnyomó
bælandi
represívny
baskı altına alan

repressive

[rɪˈpresɪv] ADJrepresivo
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

repressive

[rɪˈprɛsɪv] adj [measures, legislation, law] → répressif/ive; [regime, state] → répressif/ive
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

repressive

adjrepressiv
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

repressive

[rɪˈprɛsɪv] adjrepressivo/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

repress

(rəˈpres) verb
to keep (an impulse, a desire to do something etc) under control. He repressed a desire to hit the man.
reˈpression (-ʃən) noun
reˈpressive (-siv) adjective
severe; harsh.
reˈpressiveness noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
He was fuming under a repressive law which he was forced to acknowledge: he was dangerously poised, and Rosamond's voice now brought the decisive vibration.
It gave me the impression of a disordered mechanism which had escaped the repressive and regulating action of some controlling part--an effect such as might be expected if a pawl should be jostled from the teeth of a ratchet-wheel.
Her panting breathing comes and goes as if it would choke her; but with a repressive hand upon her bosom, she remains.
He rubbed his eyes, doubting if he really saw before him Athos and Aramis; and forced at last to yield to evidence, he was on the point of breaking forth in exclamations when he encountered a glance from the eyes of Porthos, the repressive force of which he was not inclined to dispute.
Eager, repressive towards Miss Lavish, watchful of old Mr.
This demand was met by the ruling classes with sternly repressive measures, and the socialistic Peasants' Revolt of John Ball and Wat Tyler in 1381 was violently crushed out in blood, but it expressed a great human cry for justice which could not permanently be denied.
The general leniency of the judicial procedure here, and the utter absence of all repressive measures, are a scandal to Europe.
Capitalism, organized for repressive purposes under pretext of governing the nation, would very soon stop the association if it understood our aim, but it thinks that we are engaged in gunpowder plots and conspiracies to assassinate crowned heads; and so, whilst the police are blundering in search of evidence of these, our real work goes on unmolested.
I had explained to Raffles that she was an orphan, who spent most of her time with an aristocratic aunt in the country, and the remainder under the repressive roof of a pompous politician in Palace Gardens.
The attitude of authority is bound to be repressive, and great concentration of the governing power is needed to neutralize the force of a popular movement.
de P , the President of the notorious Repressive Commission of some years ago, the Minister of State invested with extraordinary powers.
The index also cited 'violence and murder, brutal repression of public protests, and repressive laws.'