reprint


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re·print

 (rē′prĭnt′)
n.
1. Something that has been printed again, especially:
a. A new printing that is identical to an original; a reimpression.
b. A separately printed excerpt; an offprint.
2. A facsimile of a postage stamp printed after the original issue of the stamp has been discontinued.
tr.v. (rē-prĭnt′) re·print·ed, re·print·ing, re·prints
To make a new copy or edition of; print again.

re·print′er n.

reprint

n
1. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) a reproduction in print of any matter already published; offprint
2. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) a reissue of a printed work using the same type, plates, etc, as the original
vb
(Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) (tr) to print again
reˈprinter n

re•print

(v. riˈprɪnt; n. ˈriˌprɪnt)

v.t.
1. to print again; print a new impression of.
n.
2. a reproduction in print of matter already printed.
3. a new impression, without alteration, of a book or other printed work.
[1545–55]
re•print′er, n.

reprint


Past participle: reprinted
Gerund: reprinting

Imperative
reprint
reprint
Present
I reprint
you reprint
he/she/it reprints
we reprint
you reprint
they reprint
Preterite
I reprinted
you reprinted
he/she/it reprinted
we reprinted
you reprinted
they reprinted
Present Continuous
I am reprinting
you are reprinting
he/she/it is reprinting
we are reprinting
you are reprinting
they are reprinting
Present Perfect
I have reprinted
you have reprinted
he/she/it has reprinted
we have reprinted
you have reprinted
they have reprinted
Past Continuous
I was reprinting
you were reprinting
he/she/it was reprinting
we were reprinting
you were reprinting
they were reprinting
Past Perfect
I had reprinted
you had reprinted
he/she/it had reprinted
we had reprinted
you had reprinted
they had reprinted
Future
I will reprint
you will reprint
he/she/it will reprint
we will reprint
you will reprint
they will reprint
Future Perfect
I will have reprinted
you will have reprinted
he/she/it will have reprinted
we will have reprinted
you will have reprinted
they will have reprinted
Future Continuous
I will be reprinting
you will be reprinting
he/she/it will be reprinting
we will be reprinting
you will be reprinting
they will be reprinting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been reprinting
you have been reprinting
he/she/it has been reprinting
we have been reprinting
you have been reprinting
they have been reprinting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been reprinting
you will have been reprinting
he/she/it will have been reprinting
we will have been reprinting
you will have been reprinting
they will have been reprinting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been reprinting
you had been reprinting
he/she/it had been reprinting
we had been reprinting
you had been reprinting
they had been reprinting
Conditional
I would reprint
you would reprint
he/she/it would reprint
we would reprint
you would reprint
they would reprint
Past Conditional
I would have reprinted
you would have reprinted
he/she/it would have reprinted
we would have reprinted
you would have reprinted
they would have reprinted
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.reprint - a publication (such as a book) that is reprinted without changes or editing and offered again for sale
publication - a copy of a printed work offered for distribution
2.reprint - a separately printed article that originally appeared in a larger publication
article - nonfictional prose forming an independent part of a publication
Verb1.reprint - print anew; "They never reprinted the famous treatise"
reproduce - make a copy or equivalent of; "reproduce the painting"
Translations
طَبْعَة ثانِيَهيُعيد طَبْع
dotiskznovu vytisknout
genoptrykgenoptrykke
újra kinyomtat
endurprentaendurprentun
perspaudasperspausdinti
atkārtots izdevumsizdot atkārtoti
dotlačurobiť dotlačznova vytlačiť
yeniden basmayeniden basmak

reprint

[ˈriːprɪnt]
A. Nreimpresión f, reedición f
B. [ˌriːˈprɪnt] VTreimprimir

reprint

[ˈriːprɪnt]
nréimpression f
[ˌriːˈprɪnt] vtréimprimer

reprint

nNeuauflage f, → Nachdruck m

reprint

[n ˈriːˌprɪnt; vb ˌriːˈprɪnt]
1. nristampa
2. vtristampare

reprint

(riːˈprint) verb
to print more copies of (a book etc). We are reprinting his new novel already.
(ˈriːprint) noun
a copy of a book etc made by reprinting the original without any changes.
References in classic literature ?
Hence the author attaches particular importance to the public knowing for a certainty that the chapters here added have not been made expressly for this reprint. They were not published in the preceding editions of the book for a very simple reason.
This comprises all I need say on the subject; except that if I had seen occasion, I had resolved to reprint a few of these details of legal proceedings, from certain old newspapers.
The novelist, it has been said before, knows everything, and as I am in a situation to be able to tell the public how Crawley and his wife lived without any income, may I entreat the public newspapers which are in the habit of extracting portions of the various periodical works now published not to reprint the following exact narrative and calculations--of which I ought, as the discoverer (and at some expense, too), to have the benefit?
( Being a reprint from the reminiscences of JOHN H.
It is the assertion, the development, the product of those very different indispensable qualities of poetry, in the presence [8] of which the English is equal or superior to all other modern literature--the native, sublime, and beautiful, but often wild and irregular, imaginative power in English poetry from Chaucer to Shakespeare, with which Professor Minto deals, in his Characteristics of English Poets (Blackwood), lately reprinted. That his book should have found many readers we can well understand, in the light of the excellent qualities which, in high degree, have gone to the making of it: a tasteful learning, never deserted by that hold upon contemporary literature which is so animating an influence in the study of what belongs to the past.
This authoritative text is reprinted from the Library of America edition of Novels by Edith Wharton, and is based on the sixth impression of the first edition, which incorporates the last set of extensive revisions that are obviously authorial.
This was before the time of the sixpenny reprints. There was a regular supply of inexpensive fiction written to order by poor hacks for the consumption of the illiterate.
It consisted, in addition to the collection of fables given by Planudes and reprinted in the various earlier editions, of one hundred and thirty-six new fables (never before published) from MSS.
The handbills of the selectmen would cause the commitment of all the vagabonds in the State; the paragraph in the Parker's Falls Gazette would be reprinted from Maine to Florida, and perhaps form an item in the London newspapers; and many a miser would tremble for his money bags and life, on learning the catastrophe of Mr.
FIRST ISSUE OF THIS EDITION 1912 REPRINTED 1919, 1923, 1928
Denham was still occupied with the manuscript, "which contains several poems that have not been reprinted, as well as corrections." She paused for a minute, and then went on, as if these spaces had all been calculated.
'Utopia' was written and published in Latin; among the multitude of translations into many languages the earliest in English, in which it is often reprinted, is that of Ralph Robinson, made in 1551.