repristinate

repristinate

(riːˈprɪstɪˌneɪt)
vb (tr)
to make pristine again, to restore (something) to its pristine or original condition
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
1940s) wanted to repristinate theology by returning to the sources,
The point is not to repristinate these past theologies, but to read past theologians in a way which allows for them to call us into question.
Bavinck's report is clearly dated; it is a child of its own time, and we would not do it or him justice by trying to repristinate it with straightforward contemporary application.
Indeed, to choose is to repristinate and repeat the idea of oneself as an isolated, atomistic agent.
What we find in this camp are not explicit attempts to repristinate the empire, but rather more subtle forms of Constantinianism bearing the monikers of "public" or "political" theology.
The clerical hierarchy of the renascent church should repristinate itself through a dedication to pastoral service in imitation of Peter and Paul.
Certainly it says how foolish we should be if we simply tried to repristinate late antiquity.
Although Young does not draw attention to it, her two categories repristinate the well-known Romantic contrast of symbol and allegory: Coleridge's symbol has become Young's ikon, and his allegory is now called symbol (see The Statesman's Manual).
There were times that he attempted to repristinate and replicate the experience of a "golden age" in the church.
This means, in G.'s estimation, that "whatever Calvin learned from the Fathers, the medieval Schoolmen, and his fellow Reformers he made his own and integrated into his comprehensive interpretation of the Christian faith, establishing a Reformed theological tradition which, insofar as it is true to his understanding of the theological enterprise, does not merely repristinate his teaching either but remains open to further 'brotherly communication' and development" (124).
Without trying to repristinate outworn symbols Protestantism must
While Cajetan's thought is certainly indebted to Thomistic philosophical and theological norms, Nieden finds that Cajetan does not "correctly" repristinate Thomistic doctrine.