reprovable


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re·prove

 (rĭ-pro͞ov′)
tr.v. re·proved, re·prov·ing, re·proves
1. To express disapproval to (someone); criticize: reproved the children for making too much noise. See Synonyms at admonish.
2. To express disapproval about (something): "Some bigger boys laughed. But Augustine angrily reproved their frivolity" (Richard Hughes).

[Middle English reproven, from Anglo-Norman repruver, variant of Old French reprover, from Late Latin reprobāre, to disapprove; see reprobate.]

re·prov′a·ble adj.
re·prov′al n.
re·prov′er n.
re·prov′ing·ly adv.

re•prov•a•ble

(rɪˈpru və bəl)

adj.
deserving of reproof.
[1300–50; Middle English < Middle French, =reprov(er) to reprove + -able -able]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Reread and heard again in this context, the utterances of Coriolanus's backward voice seem especially misguided, reprovable.
More reprovable is the absence of running-titles; this makes it difficult for readers to find their place or to remain aware of what particular text they are reading.