reprover


Also found in: Thesaurus, Idioms.

re·prove

 (rĭ-pro͞ov′)
tr.v. re·proved, re·prov·ing, re·proves
1. To express disapproval to (someone); criticize: reproved the children for making too much noise. See Synonyms at admonish.
2. To express disapproval about (something): "Some bigger boys laughed. But Augustine angrily reproved their frivolity" (Richard Hughes).

[Middle English reproven, from Anglo-Norman repruver, variant of Old French reprover, from Late Latin reprobāre, to disapprove; see reprobate.]

re·prov′a·ble adj.
re·prov′al n.
re·prov′er n.
re·prov′ing·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.reprover - someone who finds fault or imputes blame
authority - (usually plural) persons who exercise (administrative) control over others; "the authorities have issued a curfew"
References in classic literature ?
And so philosophy is left desolate, with her marriage rite incomplete: for her own have fallen away and forsaken her, and while they are leading a false and unbecoming life, other unworthy persons, seeing that she has no kinsmen to be her protectors, enter in and dishonour her; and fasten upon her the reproaches which, as you say, her reprovers utter, who affirm of her votaries that some are good for nothing, and that the greater number deserve the severest punishment.
He is in full throat: "To pursue union at the expense of truth is treason to the Lord Jesus." In mock self-deprecation, he urges the public to "forget the obnoxious reprover (Spurgeon)" and "look at the facts." (11) In this issue Spurgeon used one of the most unfortunate phrases of the controversy.
In reply the man handed his reprover a blacksnake whip, and requested him to try his hand.