repugnance


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re·pug·nance

 (rĭ-pŭg′nəns)
n.
1. Extreme dislike or aversion.
2. Logic The relationship of contradictory terms; inconsistency.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

re•pug•nance

(rɪˈpʌg nəns)

also re•pug′nan•cy,



n.
1. the state of being repugnant.
2. strong distaste or aversion.
3. contradictoriness or inconsistency.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.repugnance - intense aversion
disgust - strong feelings of dislike
2.repugnance - the relation between propositions that cannot both be true at the same time
contradictoriness - the relation that exists when opposites cannot coexist
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

repugnance

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

repugnance

noun
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

repugnance

[rɪˈpʌgnəns] Nrepugnancia f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

repugnance

[riˈpʌgnəns] n (= disgust) → dégoût m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

repugnance

nWiderwille m, → Abneigung f(towards, for gegen)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

repugnance

[rɪˈpʌgnəns] nripugnanza
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Be it said, that though I had felt such a strong repugnance to his smoking in the bed the night before, yet see how elastic our stiff prejudices grow when love once comes to bend them.
I wished her to have this form rather than a stranger one, so that we could see her in the family without repugnance.
There were eight thousand dollars to gain, without changing his route; for which it was well worth conquering the repugnance he had for all kinds of passengers.
She made an effort to surmount the repugnance with which he inspired her.
Yet in this very repugnance to all his circumstances Pierre found a kind of tantalizing satisfaction.
The question seemed a very dubious one to Will, and his repugnance to again entering into any relation with the banker might have made him dismiss it quickly, if there had not arisen in his imagination the probability that his judgment might be more safely determined by a visit to Middlemarch.
Indeed, I have allowed a repugnance to entering shops of any kind, save my tailor's, to grow on me, and to my tailor's I fear I go too frequently.
He rises unsteadily from the bed, lays the pipe upon the hearth- stone, draws back the ragged curtain, and looks with repugnance at his three companions.
He knew that Athos not only never drank, but more, that he had a kind of repugnance to wine.
Ned Land, on seeing them, showed evident repugnance to dress himself in one.
Then Athos took from his pocket a small paper, on which two lines were written, accompanied by a signature and a seal, and presented them to him who had made too prematurely these signs of repugnance. The tall man had scarcely read these lines, seen the signature, and recognized the seal, when he bowed to denote that he had no longer any objection to make, and that he was ready to obey.
Does any secret repugnance, or any hereditary dislike, exist between you and her family?"