repugnancy


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re·pug·nan·cy

 (rĭ-pŭg′nən-sē)
n. pl. re·pug·nan·cies
Repugnance.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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repugnancy

noun
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
Its repugnancy to an adequate supply of the national exigencies has been already pointed out, and has sufficiently appeared from the trial which has been made of it.
it only shows you have the power of imagining or forming ideas in your mind; but it doth not shew that you can conceive it possible, the objects of your thought may exist without the mind: to make out this, it is necessary that you conceive them existing unconceived or unthought of, which is a manifest repugnancy. When we do our utmost to conceive the existence of external bodies, we are all the while only contemplating our own ideas.
at 138 ("The repugnancy of this type of conduct was demonstrated by Mrs.
The academy's president, Michael Greene, recently said, "There's no question about the repugnancy of many of his songs.
The notion of repugnancy, as an aspect of Miriam's case, has proved to be a central doctrine in the overall judicial discourse of custom and positivist law in Papua New Guinea.
It is disturbing when we start with a moral repugnancy for "whites only" and end up with the hipness of "women only." Men, whites, and dictators are known for seeing relationships purely in terms of power.
the feminizing of these trades-while demanding we ignore the hard reality that on the battlefield the conditions and repugnancy of war categorically remain as horrific and as unchanged as ever!
For instance, he comments on Peter's vision before visiting Cornelius (Acts 10:9ff): "The story of heaven is the story of how we learn not to call anyone profane or impure, so that a story is created in which there are, in fact, no impure or profane people, where not even disgusting people consider themselves disgusting, but rather where we have learned to disbelieve, and to help them to disbelieve, in their own repugnancy. Our question as we receive the eschatological imagination must be: Who are, for me, the repugnant beasts, or for whom am I a repugnant beast?
The whole reason for the privilege is the patient's supposed unwillingness that the ailment should be disclosed to the world at large; hence the bringing of a suit in which the very declaration, and much more the proof, discloses the ailment to the world at large, is of itself an indication that the supposed repugnancy to disclosure does not exist.
Additionally, a new statute will not be read as partially repealing a prior statute unless a "positive repugnancy" exists between the two.
In Book IV Locke defined knowledge as "the perception of the connection of and agreement, or disagreement and repugnancy, of any of our ideas." An example cited is our knowledge that white is not black, Locke arguing that to know that white is not black is simply to perceive that the idea of white is not the ideas of black.