requitable


Also found in: Thesaurus.

re·quite

 (rĭ-kwīt′)
tr.v. re·quit·ed, re·quit·ing, re·quites
1.
a. To make return for (something done or felt) in a similar or appropriate fashion: "Pearl felt the sentiment, and requited it with the bitterest hatred that can be supposed to rankle in a childish bosom" (Nathaniel Hawthorne).
b. To avenge (an insult or wrongdoing).
2.
a. To respond to (another) or do something to or for (another) in return for that person's action or emotion: "If he love me to madness, I shall never requite him" (Shakespeare).
b. To get revenge on (another) for wrongdoing.

[Middle English requiten : re-, re- + quiten, to pay; see quit.]

re·quit′a·ble adj.
re·quit′er n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
In-depth search in each individual case, spread over a period of time, leading to optional/compulsory retirement or requitable elevations, as the case may be is perhaps the answer to the situation.